The Works of Frederick Schiller, Early Dramas and Romances: The Robbers, Fiesco, Love and Intrigue, Demetrius, the Ghost-Seer, and the Sport of Destiny

By Henry G. Bohn; Friedrich Schiller | Go to book overview

shepherd guards against the wolf, the fox shall make havoc of the poultry.

SACCO. Incomparable brother--receive my thanks!--A blush is now superfluous, and I can tell thee openly what just now I was ashamed even to think.--I am a beggar if the government be not soon overturned.

CALCAGNO. What, are thy debts so great?

SACCO. So immense, that even one tenth of them would more than swallow up ten times my income. A convulsion of the state will give me breath; and if it do not cancel all my debts, at least 'twill stop the mouths of bawling creditors

CALCAGNO. I understand thee; and if then, perchance, Genoa should be freed, Sacco will be hailed his country's saviour. Let no one trick out to me the thread-bare tale of honesty, if the fate of empires hang on the bankruptcy of a prodigal and the lust of a debauchee. By heaven, Sacco, I admire the wise design of Providence, that, in us, would heal the corruptions in the heart of the state by the vile ulcers on its limbs. -- Is thy design unfolded to Verrina?

SACCO. As far as it can be unfolded to a patriot. Thou knowest his iron integrity, which ever tends to that one point, his country. His hawk-like eye is now fixed on Fiesco, and he has half-conceived a hope of thee, to join the bold conspiracy.

CALCAGNO. Oh, he has an excellent nose! Come, let us seek him, and fan the flame of liberty in his breast by our accordant spirit. [Exeunt.


SCENE IV.

JULIA, agitated with anger, and FIESCO, in a white mask, following her.

JULIA. Servants!--footmen!

FIESCO. Countess, whither are you going?--What do you intend?-----

JULIA. Nothing--nothing at all.--(To the servants, who enter, and immediately retire.)--Let my carriage draw up-----

FIESCO. Pardon me, it must not.--You are offended.

JULIA. Oh, by no means.--Away--you tear my dress to pieces.--Offended! Who is here, that can offend me? Go, pray go-----

FIESCO (upon one knee). Not till you tell me what imper tinent-----

-138-

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