The Works of Frederick Schiller: Early Dramas and Romances

By Friedrich Schiller; Henry G. Bohn | Go to book overview

SCENE X.
LEONORA and ROSA enter hastily, alarmed.

LEONORA. Murder! they cried--murder! The noise came this way.

ROSA. Surely 'twas but a common tumult, such as happens every day in Genoa.

LEONORA. They cried murder! and I distinctly heard Fiesco's name. In vain you would deceive me. My heart discovers what is concealed from my eyes. Quick! Hasten after them. See! Tell me whither they carry him.

ROSA. Collect your spirits, madam. Arabella is gone.

LEONORA. Arabella will catch his dying look. The happy Arabella! Wretch that I am! 'twas I that murdered him. If I could have engaged his heart, he would not have plunged into the world, nor rushed upon the daggers of assassins. Ah! she comes.--Away! Oh, Arabella, speak not to me!


SCENE XI.
The former, ARABELLA.

ARABELLA. The Count is living and unhurt. I saw him gallop through the city. Never did he appear more handsome. The steed that bore him pranced haughtily along, and with its proud hoof kept the thronging multitude at distance from its princely rider. He saw me as I passed, and with a gracious smile, pointing hither, thrice kissed his hand to me. (Archly.) What can I do with those kisses, madam?

LEONORA (highly pleased). Idle prattler! Restore them to him.

ROSA. See now, how soon your colour has returned!

LEONORA. His heart he is ready to fling at every wench, whilst I sigh in vain for a look! Oh woman! woman!

[Exeunt.


SCENE XII.--The Palace of ANDREAS.
GIANETTINO and LOMELLINO enter hastily.

GIANET. Let them roar for their liberty as a lioness for her young. I am resolved.

LOMEL. But--most gracious Prince!--

GIANET. Away to hell with thy Buts, thou three-hours

-170-

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