The Works of Frederick Schiller: Early Dramas and Romances

By Friedrich Schiller; Henry G. Bohn | Go to book overview

procurator! I will not yield a hair's breadth. Let Genoa's towers shake their heads, and the hoarse sea bellow No to it. I value not the rebellious multitude!

LOMEL. The people are indeed the fuel; but the nobility fan the flame. The whole republic is in a ferment, people and patricians.

GIANET. Then will I stand upon the mount like Nero, and regale myself with looking upon the paltry flames.--

LOMEL Till the whole mass of sedition falls into the hands of some enterprising leader, who will take advantage of the general devastation.

GIANET. Poh! Poh! I know but one who might be dangerous, and he is taken care of.

LOMEL. His highness comes-----

Enter ANDREAS--(both bow respectfully).

ANDREAS. Signor Lomellino, my niece wishes to take the air.

LOMEL. I shall have the honour of attending her.

[Exit LOMELLINO.


SCENE XIII.
ANDREAS and GIANETTINO.

ANDREAS. Nephew, I am much displeased with you.

GIANET. Grant me a hearing, most gracious uncle!

ANDREAS. That would I grant to the meanest beggar in Genoa, if he were worthy of it. Never to a villain, though he were my nephew. It is sufficient favour that I address thee as an uncle, not as a sovereign!

GIANET. One word only, gracious sir!

ANDREAS. Hear first what thou hast done; then answer me.--Thou hast pulled down an edifice which I have laboured for fifty years to raise--that which should have been thy uncle's mausoleum, his only pyramid--the affections of his countrymen.--This rashness Andreas pardons thee-----

GIANET. My uncle and my sovereign-----

ANDREAS. Interrupt me not. Thou hast injured that most glorious work of mine, the constitution, which I brought down from heaven for Genoa--which cost me so many sleepless nights, so many dangers, and so much blood.--Before all

-171-

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