The Works of Frederick Schiller, Early Dramas and Romances: The Robbers, Fiesco, Love and Intrigue, Demetrius, the Ghost-Seer, and the Sport of Destiny

By Henry G. Bohn; Friedrich Schiller | Go to book overview

gallows."--Hum!--He fears, because I know his tricks, my tongue may bring his honour into danger when he is Duke.-- When he is Duke? Hold, master Count! That event remains to be considered. Ah! old Doria, thy life is in my hands.--Thou art lost unless I warn thee of thy danger. Now, if I go to him and discover the plot, I save the Duke of Genoa no less than his existence and his dukedom, and gain at least this hat full of gold for my reward.--(Going, stops suddenly.) But stay, friend Hassan, thou art going on a foolish errand. Suppose this scene of riot is prevented, and nothing but good is the result.--Psha! what a cursed trick my avarice would then have played me! Come, devil, help me to make out what promises the greatest mischief; to cheat Fiesco, or to give up Doria to the dagger. If Fiesco succeed, then Genoa may prosper.--Away!--That must not be. If this Doria escape, then all remains as 'twas before, and Genoa is quiet. --That's still worse!--Ay, but to see these rebels' heads upon the block!--Hum!--On the other hand, 'twould be amusing to behold the illustrious Dorias in this evening's massacre, the victims of a rascally Moor.--No.--This doubtful question a Christian might perhaps resolve, but 'tis too deep a riddle for my Moorish brains.--I'll go propose it to some learned man. [Exit.


SCENE VIII.

An apartment in the house of the COUNTESS IMPERIALI.

JULIA in a dishabille. GIANETTINO enters, agitated.

GIANET. Good evening, sister.

JULIA (rising). It must be something extraordinary which brings the Crown Prince of Genoa to his sister!

GIANET. Sister, you are continually surrounded by butterflies, and I by wasps. How is it possible that we should meet? Let's be seated.

JULIA. You almost excite my curiosity.

GIANET. When did Fiesco visit you last?

JULIA. A strange question.--As if I burdened my memory with such trifles!

GIANET. I must know--positively.

JULIA. Well, then, he was here yesterday.

GIANET. And behaved without reserve?

JULIA. As usual.

-194-

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