The Works of Frederick Schiller: Early Dramas and Romances

By Friedrich Schiller; Henry G. Bohn | Go to book overview

GIANET. As much a coxcomb as ever?

JULIA (offended). Brother!

GIANET. (more vehemently). I say--as much a coxcomb-----

JULIA (rises, with indignation). Sir!--What do you take me for?

GIANET. (keeps his seat--sarcastically). For a mere piece of woman-flesh, wrapped up in a great--great patent of nobility. This between ourselves--there is no one by to hear us.

JULIA (enraged). Between ourselves--you are an impertinent jackanapes, and presume upon the credit of your uncle. No one by to hear us, indeed!

GIANET. Sister! sister! don't be angry,--I'm only merry because Fiesco is still as much a coxcomb as ever.--That's all I wanted to know. Your servant-----(Going.)


SCENE IX.

The former, LOMELLINO entering.

LOMEL. (to JULIA, respectfully). Pardon my boldness, gracious lady.--(To GIANETTINO.) Certain affairs which cannot be delayed----- (GIANETTINO takes him aside; JULIA sits down an grily at the piano-forte, and plays an allegro.)

GIANET. (to LOMELLINO). Is everything prepared for tomorrow?

LOMEL. Everything, prince--but the courier, who was despatched this morning to Levanto, is not yet returned, nor is Spinola arrived. Should he be intercepted!--I'm much alarmed-----

GIANET. Fear nothing. You have that list at hand?

LOMEL. (embarrassed). My lord--the list?--I do not know --I must have left it at home, in my other pocket.

GIANET. It does not signify--would that Spinola were but here. Fiesco will be found dead in his bed. I have taken measures for it.

LOMEL. But it will cause great consternation.

GIANET. In that lies our security. Common crimes but move the blood, and stir it to revenge: atrocious deeds freeze it with terror, and annihilate the faculties of man. You know the fabled power of Medusa's head--they who but looked on it were turned to stone.--What may not be done, my boy, before stones are warmed to animation?

-195-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Works of Frederick Schiller: Early Dramas and Romances
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 498

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.