The Works of Frederick Schiller: Early Dramas and Romances

By Friedrich Schiller; Henry G. Bohn | Go to book overview

Resume your arms--you must fight like lions to atone for this disgrace. (Aside to CALCAGNO.) Were you there yourself?

CALCAGNO (low). I made my way among the guards, to hear, as was my business, the watch-word from the Duke.--As I was returning, the Moor was brought-----

FIESCO (aloud). So the old man is gone to bed--we'll drum him out of his feathers--(Low.) Did he talk long with the Duke?

CALCAGNO (low). My sudden fright and your impending danger drove me away in haste-----

FIESCO (aloud). See how our countrymen stir tremble--

CALCAGNO (aloud). You should have carried on the jest (Low.) For God's sake, friend, what will this artifice avail us?

FIESCO 'Twill gain us time, and dissipate the first panic.-- (Aloud.) Ho! bring wine here!--(Low.) Did the Duke turn pale ?--(Aloud.) Well, brothers, let us drink success to this night's entertainment!--(Low.) Did the Duke turn pale?

CALCAGNO. The Moor's first word must have been CONSPIRACY for the old man started back as pale as ashes.

FIESCO (confused). Hum the devil is an artful counsellor, Calcagno--the Moor was cunning, he betrayed nothing till the knife was at their throat. Now he is indeed their saviour.--Wine is brought, he drinks to the assembly.) Comrades, success! (A knocking is heard.)

SENTINELS. Who is without?

A VOICE. The guard of the Duke's. (The NOBLES rush about the court in despair.)

FIESCO (stepping forward). No, my friends! Be not alarmed!--I am here--quick, remove these arms--be men, I entreat you--this visit makes me hope, that Andreas still doubts our plot. Retire into the palace: recall your spirits. Soldiers, throw open the gate!--(They retire, the gates are opened)


SCENE VIII.

FIESCO (as if coming from the palace). Three GERMAN SOLDIERS bringing the MOOR, bound.

FIESCO. Who calls me?

GERMANS Bring us to the Count!

FIESCO THE Count is here, who wants me?

-205-

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