The Works of Frederick Schiller: Early Dramas and Romances

By Friedrich Schiller; Henry G. Bohn | Go to book overview

CALCAGNO (calls out). Who goes there? What have we here?

GERMAN. German blows--(retreat fighting, and carry off the body of GIANET.).


SCENE V.

LEONORA, in male attire, ARABELLA following--they walk along timidly.

ARABELLA. Come, my lady, pray let us hasten onward.

LEONORA. This way the tumult rages--hark! was not that a dying groan?--Ah, they surround him!--At Fiesco's breast they point their fatal muskets--at my breast they point them--Hold! hold! It is my husband! (Throws her arms up in agony.)

ARABELLA. For Heaven's sake, my lady!-----

LEONORA (with wild enthusiasm, calling on all sides). O my Fiesco! my Fiesco!--His firmest friends desert him.-- The faith of rebels is unsteady (shuddering).--Rebels! Heaven! Is Fiesco, then, a chief of rebels?

ARABELLA. No, Signora. He is the great deliverer of Genoa.

LEONORA (emphatically). Ha! that would indeed be glorious!--And shall Leonora tremble?--shall the bravest re- publican be wedded to the most timid woman ?--Go, Arabella! When men contend for empires, even a woman's soul may kindle into valour. (Drums again heard.) I'll rush among the combatants.

ARABELLA. (claspinq her hands together). All-gracious Heaven!

LEONORA. Softly! What strikes my foot? Here is a hat--and here a mantle. A sword too!--(she lifts it up) --a heavy sword, my Arabella; but I can carry it, and the sword shall not disgrace its bearer. (The alarm-bell sounds.)

ARABELLA. Hark! Hark! How terrible it sounds yonder, from the tower of the Dominicans! God have mercy on us!

LEONORA (enthusiastically). Rather say, how delightful! In the majestic sound of this alarm-bell my Fiesco speaks to Genoa. (Drums are heard louder.) Ha! Never did flutes so sweetly etrike my ear. Even these drums are animated

-219-

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