The Works of Frederick Schiller, Early Dramas and Romances: The Robbers, Fiesco, Love and Intrigue, Demetrius, the Ghost-Seer, and the Sport of Destiny

By Henry G. Bohn; Friedrich Schiller | Go to book overview

LADY M. (in a tone of intense suffering). Nothing-- Nothing-but that you destroy yourself and me--and, with us, yet a third.

FERD. A third?

LADY M. Never can you marry Louisa+ADs- never can you be happy with me. We shall all be the victims of your father's rashness. I can never hope to possess the heart of a husband who has been forced to give me his hand.

FERD. Forced, lady? Forced?--And yet given? Will you enforce a hand without a heart?--Will you tear from a maiden a man, who is the whole world to her?--Will you tear a maiden from a man, who has centered all his hopes of happiness on her alone?--Will you do this, lady?--you who but a moment before were the lofty noble-minded daughter of Britain?

LADY M. I will, because I must (earnestly and firmly.) My passions, Walter, overcome my. tenderness for you. -- My honour has no alternative--Our union is the talk of the whole city.--Every eye, every shaft of ridicule is bent against me. 'Twere a stain which time could never efface should a subject of the prince reject my hand--Appease your father, if you have the power Defend yourself, as you best may--my resolution is taken.--The mine is fired, and I abide the issue.

+AFs-Exit. FERDINAND remains in speechless astonishment for some moments+ADs- then rushes wildly out.


SCENE IV.--Miller's House.
MILLER MEETING LOUISA AND MRS. MILLER

MILLER. Ay ay I told you how it would be

LOUISE (hasteniny to him with anxiety). What, father? What?

MILLER (running up and down the room). My cloak, there -- Quick, quick--I must be beforehand with him--My cloak, I say--Yes, yes this was just what I expected

LOUISA. For God's sake, father tell me?

MRS. M. What is the matter, Miller? What alarms you?

MILLER (throwing down his wig). Let that go to the friseur.--What is the matter, indeed?--And my beard, too, is nearly half an inch long--What's the matter?--What do you think, you old carrion.--The devil has broke loose, and you may look out for squalls.

-267-

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