The Works of Frederick Schiller: Early Dramas and Romances

By Friedrich Schiller; Henry G. Bohn | Go to book overview

whole heaven, my wildest wishes were hushed! No thought but of her and eternity was present to my mind.--Oh, God! and yet she felt nothing?--Nothing? but that her artifice bad triumphed!--That her charms were flattered!--Death and vengeance!--Nothing, but that I was betrayed!


SCENE III.

FERDINAND, the MARSHAL.

MARSHALL. (tripping into the room). I am told, my dear baron, that you have expressed a wish-----

FERD. (muttering to himself). To break your rascally neck. (Aloud.) Marshal, this letter must have dropped out of your pocket on parade. (With a malicious smile.) And I have been the fortunate finder.

MARSHAL. YOU?

FERD. By a singular coincidence! Now, balance thy account with heaven!

MARSHAL. You quite alarm me, baron!

FERD. Read it, sir, read it! (Turning from him.) If I am not good enough for a lover, perhaps I may do for a pimp. (While the MARSHAL reads, FERDINAND goes to the wall and takes down two pistols.)

KALB. (throws the letter upon the table, and rushes off). Confusion!

FERD. (leads him back by the arm). Wait a little, my dear Marshal! The intelligence contained in that letter appears to be agreeable! The finder must have his reward. (Showing him the pistols.)

MARSHAL (starts back in alarm). Have you lost your senses, baron?

FERD. (in a terrible voice). I have more than enough left to rid the world of such a scoundrel as you!--Choose one of these instantly! (He forces a pistol into the MARSHAL'S hand, and then draws out his handkerchief.) And now, take the other end of this handkerchief!--It was given me by the strumpet herself!

MARSHAL. What, shoot over the handkerchief! Baron, are you mad? What can you be thinking of?

FERD. Lay Hold of it, I, say! or you will be sure to miss your a m, coward!--How the coward trembles! You should thank God, you pitiful coward, that you have a chance, for

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