The Works of Frederick Schiller: Early Dramas and Romances

By Friedrich Schiller; Henry G. Bohn | Go to book overview

the carriage at the door. (She tears herself away, and is hurrying out, when the MARSHAL arrests her progress.) How now? Pitiful creature, art thou still there?

MARSHAL. (who all this while has been gazing in vacant astonishment at the letter). And must I be the person to put this letter into the most august hands of his most Serene Highness?

LADY M. Pitiful creature, even thou! Thou must deliver into his most august hands, and convey to his most august ears, that, as I cannot go barefoot to Loretto, I will support myself by the labour of my hands, that I may be purified from the disgrace of having condescended to rule him. (She hurries off -- the rest silently disperse.)


ACT V.

SCENE I.

--Twilight; a room in MILLERS House.

LOUISA sits silent and motionless in a dark corner of the room, her head reclining upon her hand.--After a long pause, MILLER enters with a lantern, the light of which he casts anxiously round the chamber, without observing LOUISA, he then puts his hat on the table, and sets down the lantern

LOUISA, MILLER.

MILL. She is not here either. No, she is not here!--I have wandered through every street;--I have sought her with every acquaintance;--I have inquired at every door! No one has seen my child! (A silence of some moments.) Patience, poor unhappy father! Patience till morning; then perhaps the corpse of your only one may come floating to shore.-- Oh, God in heaven! What though my heart has hung too idolatrously upon this daughter,--yet surely the punishment is severe! Heavenly Father! Surely it is severe! I will not murmur, Heavenly Father; but the punishment is indeed severe! (Throws himself sorrowfully into a chair.)

LOUISA. (without moving from her seat). Thou dost well, wretched old man! Learn betimes to lose.

MILL. (starts up eagerly). Ah! art thou there, my child? Art thou there?--But wherefore thus alone, and without a light?

LOUISA. Yet am I not alone. When all things around me are dark and gloomy, then have I the companionship which most I love

-311-

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