The Works of Frederick Schiller, Early Dramas and Romances: The Robbers, Fiesco, Love and Intrigue, Demetrius, the Ghost-Seer, and the Sport of Destiny

By Henry G. Bohn; Friedrich Schiller | Go to book overview

lover, but thou hast made a father happy. (Embracing her and alternately laughing and crying.) My child! my child! I was not worthy to live so blest a moment! God knows, how I, poor miserable sinner, became possessed of such an angel!-- My Louisa! My Paradise!--Oh! I know but little of love; but that to rend its bonds must be a bitter grief, I can well believe!

LOUISA. But let us hasten from this place, my father!--Let us fly from the city, where my companions scoff at me, and my good name is lost for ever--let us away, far away, from a spot, where every object tells of my ruined happiness--let us fly, if it be possible! -----

MILL. Whither thou wilt, my daughter! The bread of the Lord grows everywhere, and He will grant ears to listen to my music.--Yes! we will fly and leave all behind.--I will set the story of your sorrows to the lute, and sing of the daughter who rent her own heart to preserve her father's--We will beg with the ballad from door to door, and sweet will be the alms bestowed by the hand of weeping sympathy!


SCENE II.

The former; FERDINAND.

LOUISA (who perceives him first, throws herself shrieking into MILLER'S arms). God! There he is! I am lost!

MILL. Who? Where?

LOUISA (points, with averted face, to the MAJOR, and presses closer to her father). 'Tis he! 'Tis he Himself!--Look round, father, look round!--he comes to murder me!

MILL. (perceives him and starts back). How, Baron? You here?

FERD. (approaches slowly, stands opposite to LOUISA, and fixes a stern and piercing look upon her. After a pause, he says) Stricken conscience, I thank thee!--Thy confession is dreadful, but swift and true, and spares me the torment of an explanation!-----Good evening, Miller!

MILL. For God's sake! Baron, what seek you? What brings you hither? What means this surprise?

FERD. I knew a time, when the day was divided into seconds, when eagerness for my presence hung upon the weights of the tardy clock, and when every pulse-throb was

-316-

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