The Works of Frederick Schiller, Early Dramas and Romances: The Robbers, Fiesco, Love and Intrigue, Demetrius, the Ghost-Seer, and the Sport of Destiny

By Friedrich Schiller; Henry G. Bohn | Go to book overview

vants assembled round him. The Prince could hardly believe his senses, and commanded him to proceed. With a surprising degree of facility he began to vary a touching adagio air with some fine extempore variations, which he executed with all the taste of a virtuoso. The Prince, who, as you know, is a judge of music, says that he might play with confidence in the finest choir in Italy.

"I must dismiss this man," said he to me next morning, "for I am unable to reward him according to his merits."

Biondello, who had overheard these words, came forward. "If you dismiss me, gracious Prince," said he, "you deprive me of my best reward."

"You are born to something better than to serve," answered my master. "I must not stand in the way of your fortune."

"Do not press upon me any better fortune, gracious Sir, than that which I have chosen for myself."

"To neglect talent like yours-----No! I can never permit it."

"Then permit me, gracious Sir, sometimes to exercise it in your presence."

Preparations were immediately made for carrying this proposition into effect. Biondello had a room assigned to him next the apartment of the Prince, so that he can lull him to sleep with his strains, and wake him in the same manner. The Prince wished to double his salary, but Biondello declined, requesting that this intended boon should be retained in his master's hands as a capital of which he might some day wish to avail himself. The Prince expects that he will soon come to ask a favour at his hands; and whatever it may be, it is granted beforehand. Farewell, dearest friend. I am waiting with impatience for tidings from K * * * n.


LETTER III. .
BARON VON F----- TO COUNT VON O-----

June 4th.

The Marquis of Civitella, who is now entirely recovered from his wounds, was last week introduced to the Prince by his uncle the Cardinal, and since then he has followed him

-443-

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