The Poetry of John Donne: A Study in Explication

By Doniphan Louthan | Go to book overview

2
Patterns of Parting

THIS CHAPTER WILL supply, as no other chapter in the essay will, full-length analyses of poems--the type of analyses presupposed by the shorter exegeses elsewhere in the essay. Each atom must be audited, but the full account of the process is reserved for this chapter only.

One may without great violence group Donne's valediction poems together for consideration. Apart from the obvious four (Window, Book, Weeping, Mourning), there are a number of poems which might be classed as valedictions. I have here chosen the Weeping and the Mourning valedictions, plus "Elegie XVI." In each of these three poems the speaker is bidding his beloved farewell, prior to an extended absence. The attitude towards the beloved in these poems, is Petrarchan, rather than cynical. Indeed, their tone is so lovingly tender that these poems have become specifically identified, on the basis of the sinceritas heresy plus somewhat scanty external evidence, with Donne's own biography: he as the model husband must have been addressing his devoted wife.

My choice of these genre poems for this location was not altogether arbitrary (they virtually enjoy genre status). One item of proof is the fact that this group--and the first poem in

-35-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Poetry of John Donne: A Study in Explication
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Foreword 7
  • Contents 9
  • 1 - An Invocation to the Donne Canon 13
  • 2 - Patterns of Parting 35
  • 3 - Off with That Girdle! 58
  • 4 - The Poet as Lawyer 81
  • 5 - In Sonnets Pretty Romes 105
  • 6 - Lightness Depresseth Us 139
  • Notes 176
  • Bibliography 183
  • Index 189
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 196

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.