The Art of Rudyard Kipling

By J. M. S. Tompkins | Go to book overview

CHAPTER THREE
Tales for Children

It is not easy to take a dispassionate view of a book to which we have been much indebted in youth. Sometimes we are even unwilling to disturb the original associations by trying to do so, for a child's imagination can be consciously enlarged by a mediocre book. No deflating experience awaited me when, after a break of years, I came back to the books that Kipling wrote for children; yet, if this study had aimed at critical evaluation, I think I should not have dared to write this chapter. For my purpose of analysis and display, however, it is surely a positive advantage that I read and re-read the books as a child. They have of late been sometimes belittled and often ignored in criticisms of Kipling, though this is in face of the fact that he says more about theme-- specially about the Puck books--in Something of Myself than about any other of his works, after his beginnings. It has even been questioned whether children have ever cared for them. There should be, then, some value in the testimony of a reader who was a child of the generation for which they were first written.

I had the great advantage of being read aloud to, extremely well, by both my parents. The Just So Stories were on my nursery shelves. The jocular manner and the refrains ('You must not forget the suspenders, Best Beloved') amused me, though a young cousin complained: 'You needn't say that again.' But the charm lay in the hints of mystery and remoteness. 'The great grey-green, greasy Limpopo river, all set about with fever-trees' never sent me to the map but rolled through my imagination, and runs off my pen now without any reference to 'The Elephant's Child'. 'The Beaches of Socotra And the Pink Arabian Sea' sang in my fancy as Cotopaxi and Chimborazo did in W. J. Turner's. I was present at the creation of the world with 'The Crab that Played with the Sea' (though I perfectly understood that this was fantasy), and the prehistoric background of the Taffimai stories

-55-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Art of Rudyard Kipling
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Chapter One - Kipling and the Novel 1
  • Chapter Two - Laughter 33
  • Chapter Three - Tales for Children 55
  • Chapter Four - Simplicity and Complexity 85
  • Chapter Five - Hatred and Revenge 119
  • Chapter Six - Healing 158
  • Chapter Seven - Man and the Abyss 185
  • Chapter Eight - Change and Persistence 222
  • List 260
  • Index 270
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 282

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.