Light on a Dark Horse: An Autobiography (1901-1935)

By Roy Campbell | Go to book overview

IX
MORE ABOUT PEACE COTTAGE

QUITE as memorable as any of our jaunts on the lagoon or into the forests were the long winter evenings at Peace Cottage when my mother would play the piano for us and we would sing the old Gaelic, Highland, or Border songs she had learnt from her grandparents in Scotland.

My mother knew a thousand ways of amusing us on these long evenings, by making all sorts of toys, mostly out of paper. She was a magician with her hands. The great Spanish writer Unamuno, who also had a passion for folding paper into toys, said he was dumbfounded by my mother's toys, which included a paper kettle in which water could be boiled, without burning the paper, over the flame of a candle. When Messrs. Pitman persuaded my mother to show them her designs and she gave them some thousand or so, that famous firm made a big book of them which has sold far more editions than all the books I have ever published--and has been in use for years in all sorts of children's schools and hospitals and in-

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Light on a Dark Horse: An Autobiography (1901-1935)
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Table of Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • I - Forebears 3
  • II - Early Days in Durban 19
  • III - A Human Rhinoceros 42
  • IV - The Surly Tutor of My Youth 57
  • V - Holidays in Rhodesia 65
  • VI - Octopuses 83
  • VII - Peace Cottage 89
  • VIII - The Lagoon 96
  • IX - More About Peace Cottage 106
  • X - Birds 116
  • XI - Doctors and Witch-Doctors 130
  • XII - The Durban Breakwater 140
  • XIII - Voyage to England--Oxford-- London 156
  • XIV - The Land of the Cypress And Myrtle 169
  • XV - The Camargue 183
  • XVI - The Lights of London 202
  • XVII - Marriage 215
  • XVIII - Martigues 232
  • XIX - Jousting 239
  • XX - Under the Sea 253
  • XXII - To Spain 276
  • XXIII - The Coming of the Terror 291
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