Philosophic Thought in France and the United States: Essays Representing Major Trends in Contemporary French and American Philosophy

By Marvin Farber | Go to book overview

FRENCH PHILOSOPHICAL TRADITION BETWEEN THE TWO WARS

Jacques Havet*


TO CLAUDE ROUSSEL

It may appear a hopeless enterprise to attempt to give a true, objective, and complete picture of philosophical developments in a period so close to our own. Whoever undertakes this task is not only faced by a superabundance of material, but finds it almost impossible to set aside his personal predilections. And, in a deeper sense, through his person, today is passing judgment upon yesterday, and this close-up view is likely to falsify perspectives and to be contradicted by history, which will restore values to their right places. The pages that follow, therefore, make no attempt to adopt a universal point of view of French philosophy between the two wars. To go to the roots of the matter meant extracting whatever appears to have preserved significance for philosophy today from what was only a little while ago topical philosophical speculation.

Another difficulty was to decide upon a general plan which should illumine, without distorting, the complexity of philosophic evolution. To render the movement of life would involve following, abandoning, and then retracing a hundred different paths; it would mean going outside of France and analyzing the influence of foreign philosophies on French tradition; and, finally, a period such as this does not constitute a whole in itself: the two outside dates, 1919 and 1939, do not indicate breaks in the continuity of philosophical evolution.

Nevertheless, in this particular case, the shocks caused by the First War and the anxious awaiting of another upheaval mark clearly enough a natural period of history, a period of investigation rather than one of

____________________
*
Born in 1919. Received his higher education in the École Normale Supérieure, Paris, and in the Sorbonne, and became an Agrégé de Philosophie. At present a member of the Unesco Secretariat in Paris, and deals specially with the programme of Unesco in the field of Philosophy and Humanistic Studies. Author of Kant et le problème du temps ( 1947).

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Philosophic Thought in France and the United States: Essays Representing Major Trends in Contemporary French and American Philosophy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 778

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.