SWEET TAIL (GYPSIES)

Curves.

Hold in the coat. Hold back ladders and a creation and nearly sudden extra coppery ages with colors and a clean voice gyp hoarse. Hold in that curl with a good man. Hold in cheese. Hold in cheese. Hold in cheese.

A cool brake, a cool brake not a success not a resound a re-sound and a little pan with a yell oh yes so yet change, famous, a green a green colored oak, a handsome excursion, a really handsome log, a regulation to exchange oars, a regulation or more press more precise cold pieces, more yet in the teeth within the teeth. This is the sun in. This is the lamb of the lantern with chalk. With chalk a shadow shall be a sneeze in a tooth in a tin tooth, a turned past, a turned little corset, a little tuck in a pink look and with a pin in, a pin in.

Win lake, eat splashes dig salt change benches.

Win lake eat splashes dig salt change benches.

Can in.

Come a little cheese. Come a little cheese and same same tall sun with a little thing to team, team now and a bass a whole some gurgle, little tin, little tin soak, soak why Sunday, supreme measure.

No nice burst, no nice burst sourly. Suppose a butter glass is clean and there is a bow suppose it lest the bounding ocean and a medium sized bloat in the cunning little servant handkerchief is in between.

Cuts when cuts when ten, lie on this, singling wrist tending, singling the pin.

Lie on this, show sup the boon that nick the basting thread thinly and night night gown and pit wet kit. Loom down the thorough narrow. It is not cuddle and

-65-

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Geography and Plays
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • The Work of Gertrude Stein 5
  • Table of Contents 9
  • Ada 14
  • Miss Furr and Miss Skeene 17
  • A Collection 23
  • France 27
  • Americans 39
  • Italians 46
  • Sweet Tail (gypsies) 65
  • I- Must Try to Write the History Of Belmonte 70
  • In the Grass (on Spain) 75
  • England 82
  • Scenes. Actions and Disposition Of Relations and Positions 97
  • The King or Something - (the Public is Invited to Dance) 122
  • Publishers, the Portrait Gallery And The Manuscripts at the British Museum 134
  • Roche 141
  • Braque 144
  • Portrait of Prince B. D. 150
  • Mrs. Whitehead 154
  • Portrait of Constance Fletcher 157
  • Johnny Grey 166
  • A Portrait of F. B. 176
  • Sacred Emily 178
  • Iiiiiiiiii. 189
  • One - Carl Van Vechten 199
  • A Portrait of One 201
  • A Curtain Raiser 202
  • Ladies' Voices 203
  • What Happened - A Five Act Play 205
  • White Wines - Three Acts 209
  • Do Let Us Go Away - A Play 215
  • For the Country Entirely - A Play in Letters 227
  • Scene 2. 231
  • Scene 3. 232
  • Scene 4. 236
  • Scene 7. 236
  • Scene 3. 237
  • Turkey and Bones and Eating and We Liked It - A Play 239
  • Scene III 240
  • Scene IV - An Interlude. 241
  • Scene V - Farmer. 243
  • Scene VII 243
  • Scene IX 244
  • Scene X 247
  • Scene XIII 250
  • Scene XVII 251
  • Every Afternoon - A Dialogue 254
  • Captain Walter Arnold - A Play 260
  • Please Do Not Suffer - A Play 262
  • He Said It - Monologue 267
  • Counting Her Dresses - A Play 275
  • I like It to Be a Play - A Play 286
  • Not Sightly - A Play 290
  • Bonne Annee - A Play 302
  • Mexico - A Play 304
  • Act II 306
  • Scene II 307
  • Scene III 308
  • Scene IV 309
  • Act V 313
  • Act V 313
  • Scene II 314
  • Scene II 317
  • Scene IV 321
  • Act IV 322
  • Scene IV 325
  • Scene II 327
  • Scene IV 328
  • Scene II 328
  • A Family of Perhaps Three 331
  • Advertisements 341
  • Pink Melon Joy 347
  • If You Had Three Husbands 377
  • Work Again 392
  • Tourty or Tourtebattre - A Story of the Great War 401
  • Next. Life and Letters of Marcel Duchamp 405
  • Land of Nations. - [sub-Title and Ask Asia] 407
  • Accents in Alsace. - A Reasonable Tragedy. 409
  • The Psychology of Nations Or What Are You Looking At 416
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