A Dual Heritage: The Public Career of Oscar S. Straus

By Naomi W. Cohen | Go to book overview

two
MINISTER TO TURKEY

I

The Democratic National Committee thought well enough of Straus' services during the campaign to reward him with a political office. Straus himself was not interested until the fall of 1886 when he met Senator Gorman by chance in Chicago. The senator stirred Straus' desire for the ministerial post in Constantinople, then being vacated by S. S. Cox, and he forwarded his recommendation to the President. Since Gorman doubted the efficacy of his own endorsement, possibly because of his growing estrangement from Cleveland, Straus mustered support from other quarters. George Jones, owner of the New York Times, Oswald Ottendorfer, owner of the Staats-Zeitung, and John Foord of Harper's Weekly all urged the appointment upon the President.1 Doubtless this array of Mugwump support was impressive, but Cleveland asked for one additional requisite: approval by the powerful missionary groups. The Ottoman empire constituted the largest field abroad for the Protestant missions, and Cleveland was concerned about these missionary groups having to look to a Jew for official protection of their interests. With the help of publisher A. S. Barnes, a friend of Isidor and a member of the influential American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, the Board offi-

-21-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Dual Heritage: The Public Career of Oscar S. Straus
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • One - The Emergence Of a Liberal 3
  • Two - Minister To Turkey 21
  • Three - A Merchant In Politics 39
  • Four - Communal Stewardship 55
  • Five - Second Mission To Turkey 74
  • Six - In the Paths Of Peace 102
  • Seven - Humanitarian Diplomacy 121
  • Eight - Secretary Of Commerce And Labor 145
  • Nine - The Taft Years 174
  • Ten - "The Future Belongs To Progressivism" 199
  • Eleven - Peace And War 228
  • Twelve - The Fight For The League 252
  • Thirteen - End Of An Era 284
  • Fourteen - In Perspective 295
  • Notes 303
  • Bibliography 365
  • Acknowledgments 379
  • Index 381
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 396

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.