A Study of Six Plays by Ibsen

By Brian W. Downs | Go to book overview

A DOLL'S HOUSE
(Et Dukkehjem) 1879

I

BETWEEN Peer Gynt of 1867 and A Doll's House of 1879 a great gulf is fixed. The purely formal difference, of which a superficial glance at the list of the dramatis personae in either play and at the typography of the pages gives a premonition, corresponds to an equally far-reaching difference in scope and approach. The actual character and outlook of the author, nearly forty years old when Peer Gynt appeared, could scarcely be expected now to undergo any fundamental change. But in many externalities he put on a new man: he took up his abode in the land of the future, Germany, rather than the land of the past, Italy, he adopted the frock-coat, top hat and umbrella for which the caricaturists loved him, he shaved off his full black beard and, more remarkable, he completely altered his handwriting.

October 1873, midway between Peer Gynt and The Doll's House, had seen the publication of his most ambitious work, the ten-act play on Julian the Apostate's rearguard action against Christianity, Emperor and Galilean ( Kejser og Galilæer). Bringing into the world what had been conceived nine years earlier proved a hard and lengthy labour. If it had not been for that ingrained thrift of his, which hated to discard matter once it had been subjected to the artistic process, Emperor and Galilean might perhaps never have been finished. The feebleness of the second part, wherein no dramatic excitement or skill offsets the meagreness of the intellectual content, suggests work against the grain, a loss of interest on the author's part.

There are good grounds for such supposition. In his famous inaugural lecture at Copenhagen in the autumn of 1871,1

____________________
1
Printed in 'Inledning' to Emigrantliteraturen ( 1872), being vol. 1 of HovedstrØmninger i det 19de Aarhundredes Litteratur (not in the English translation). Brandes was then twenty-nine years of age, on the point of becoming one of the directors of his country's thought.

-104-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Study of Six Plays by Ibsen
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • Prefatory Note xi
  • Chronological List of Ibsen's Writings xii
  • Love's Comedy 1
  • Brand - 1866 34
  • Peer Gynt - 1867 70
  • A Doll's House 104
  • The Wild Duck 147
  • The Master Builder 178
  • Select Bibliography 206
  • Index 209
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 218

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.