Century of Conflict: The Struggle Between the French and British in Colonial America

By Joseph Lister Rutledge | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VI
CHALLENGE

Frontenac's plan or a three-pronged attack on New York, New Hampshire, and Maine. Ste. Hélène's desperate journey to Schenectady. Political dissensions leave that city unprepared. Scenes of massacre. Simon Schermerhorn alerts Albany. François Hertel at Salmon Falls and the Wooster River. Fort Loyal destroyed. Mounting anger of English results in a united plan. St. Castin and Port Royal.

Frontenac's plan as finally formulated was for a three- pronged attack that would fan out to spread fear and desolation over all of England's northern colonies. One invading force, based on Montreal, would strike by way of Lake Champlain. Albany was its probable point of attack. Another force would start from Three Rivers to raid the border settlements of New Hampshire, while from Quebec the third expedition would drive toward Maine.

With the exception of Denonville's ill-starred attack on the Iroquois, the expedition against Albany was the most pretentious ever staged, judged by the character of its leadership. It was shared by Nicholas de Mantet, who with Du Lhut had provided that one small victory to lighten the darkness shrouding the land before Frontenac returned. Wherever De Manet's name appears it is in association with swift and decisive action, as it was here. Sharing command with him was that second among the fabulous Le Moyne brothers, Jacques de Ste. Hélène. With him was his brother, Pierre d'Iberville, who stood just at the doorway of his amazing adventures.

Ste. Hélène was perhaps the most attractive of the ten Le Moyne brothers. He had less of arrogance and more of friendliness. He was a shrewd and determined fighter, but

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