Century of Conflict: The Struggle Between the French and British in Colonial America

By Joseph Lister Rutledge | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXVII
"NOW THE KING CAN SLEEP"

With the capture of Quebec, General Murray assumes command of the city. A bitter winter of hunger and cold and sickness and overhanging threat culminates in the spring with Lévis' approach. Murray's daring assault brings on the sanguinary battle of Ste. Foy, which leaves the English defeated and Lévis uncertain of the wisdom of attack. The siege and relief. The retirement of Lévis. Amherst's three-pronged attack on Montreal. It's surrender. The Peace of Paris, the end of the French empire of the West.

Quebec, the gray city on the hill, had been challenged many times. It was captured at last. The cost of that accomplishment had been heavy. Two great men had laid down their lives there, one in victory, one in defeat. To most people it might seem that this was the logical end, the time for the actors to leave this stage.

It was not quite the end, however. On that date, September 19, 1759, General James Murray was writing in his diary, "This day I marched into town, or more properly the ruins of it, with the battalions of Amherst, Bragg and Otway." The city that had been won at so great cost had now to be held in the face of immeasurably stronger forces determined to get it back. It was not an easy task Murray had assumed, though happily it was to his liking. Admirals Saunders and Holmes were sailing away, and with them the other brigadiers who had followed Wolfe to Quebec. For help Murray could only turn to the distant Champlain corridor where the constitutionally tardy General Amherst, commanding all the forces in North America, was maturing his plans.

Opposing him, Murray knew, were all Montcalm's able brigadiers, Lévis, Bourlamaque, Bougainville, men whose affec-

-497-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Century of Conflict: The Struggle Between the French and British in Colonial America
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 512

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.