The Public Papers of Chief Justice Earl Warren

By Henry M. Christman; Earl Warren | Go to book overview

Editor's Note

EARL WARREN needs no introduction. His achievements speak for themselves.

A word about the preparation of this volume is in order. In the editor's judgment, it includes many of the most famous and significant papers from the many years the Chief Justice has devoted to public service. No book can be all- inclusive, however, and the editor regrets that various other documents, also of interest and significance, could not be published as well.

So that the compilation of papers might be as thorough as possible, the editor requested permission to consult the files of the Chief Justice. The Chief Justice kindly granted the request; and this way the extent of his participation in the book. The editor bears sole responsibility for the book, for the selections therein, and for the initiation of this publishing endeavor.

Two editorial features should be noted here. In their original form, the addresses in Section I contained miscellaneous details which had meaning only for the listening audience. These references have been omitted. In Section III, the original footnotes, which consisted primarily of case-number citations, have also been omitted. There is no other abridgment whatever.

No book can published without the assistance of many persons; and to each and all of those who helped at one step or another with this volume, the editor extends grateful thanks.

HENRY M. CHRISTMAN

-xiii-

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The Public Papers of Chief Justice Earl Warren
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Editor's Note xiii
  • I - California and the Nation The Governor Speaks His Mind 1
  • Constitutional Reform And the Development Of State Government 3
  • Education 11
  • Equal Rights for All 14
  • Penal Reform 19
  • Public Health 31
  • The Republican Party 38
  • II - Liberty and the Law Addresses Of the Chief Justice 57
  • III - The Scales of Justice Supreme Court Decisions 107
  • Equality Before the Law 109
  • Justice Under Law 130
  • The Chief Justice Dissents 205
  • IV - The Law and the Future The Chief Justice Looks Ahead 219
  • The Law and the Future 221
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