Romance and Realism in Southern Politics

By T. Harry Williams | Go to book overview

Frank Graham. And although the South is generally considered to be provincial, internationally minded Southern congressmen supported Wilson, a native Southerner, in his fight for the League of Nations.

No one is better qualified than T. Harry Williams to disentangle the web of Southern politics. The distinguished Boyd Professor of History at Louisiana State University is an authority on the Civil War and an objective student of the South. Familiar with both the old and the new, he is now engaged in completing a study of the Longs of Louisiana. The faculty and students of Mercer University heard his provocative lectures on "Romance and Realism in Southern Politics" with great pleasure; the Lamar Committee hopes that the readers of this volume will receive a measure of the same enjoyment.

With the publication of this fourth series of Eugenia Dorothy Blount Lamar Memorial Lectures, delivered at Mercer University in November, 1960, the Lamar Committee and the University reaffirm their gratitude to the late Mrs. Lamar's wisdom and generosity in endowing this perpetual series of lectures. Mrs. Lamar, a cultural leader in Macon and the South for nearly three-quarters of a century, was keenly interested in the continuation of traditional Southern values amid the kaleidoscope of social and economic changes taking place in the modern South. She left a legacy to Mercer University with the request that it be used to "provide lectures of the very highest type of scholarship which will aid in the permanent preservation of the values of Southern culture, history, and literature."

BENJAMIN W. GRIFFITH, JR., Chairman

The Lamar Lecture Committee

Mercer University

Macon, Georgia

-x-

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Romance and Realism in Southern Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface xi
  • Lecture One - The Distinctive South 1
  • Lecture Two - The Politics of Reconstruction 17
  • Lecture Three - The Politics of Populism And Progressivism 44
  • Lecture Four - The Politics of the Longs 65
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