The Backgrounds of Shakespeare's Plays

By Karl J. Holzknecht | Go to book overview
Coronation of King Richard III ( 1483); rumor of the illness of Queen Anne ( 1485); murder of the princes in the Tower ( 1483); defection of Buckingham ( 1483); death of Queen Anne ( 1485); Richard's offer of marriage to his niece Elizabeth of York, through her mother ( 1485); capture of Buckingham ( 1483).
Execution of Buckingham ( 1483); expedition of Henry of Richmond ( 1483, 1485); defeat and death of King Richard at Bosworth Field ( 1485); proclamation of Henry of Richmond as King Henry VII and his marriage to Elizabeth of York ( 1485).

THE FAMOUS HISTORY OF THE LIFE OF KING HENRY THE EIGHT
Dates of the reign: 1509-1547Period covered by the play: June, 1520-July, 1544Historical events treated or alluded to in the play: INTRIGUE AT THE TUDOR COURT
I. Meeting of King Henry VIII and Francis I at the Field of the Cloth of Gold ( 1520); enmity between the Duke of Buckingham and Cardinal Wolsey ( 1520); breach of peace, attachment of English goods by the French at Bordeaux ( 1522); visit of the Emperor Charles V to England, his bribery of Wolsey ( 1520); arrest of Buckingham ( 1521); opposition to Wolsey's tax commissions to finance the French wars ( 1525); intercession of Queen Katherine (unhistorical); accusation of treason against Buckingham ( 1521); criticism of gallicized Englishmen ( 1519); revels at the Cardinal's palace in York Place ( 1527); meeting there of Henry VIII and Anne Bullen (unhistorical).
II. Trial and execution of Buckingham ( 1521); beginning of divorce proceedings against Katherine of Aragon ( 1527); Cardinal Campeius in England ( 1528); Anne Bullen created marchioness of Pembroke ( 1532); trial of Queen Katherine, her appeal to the pope ( 1529).
III. Interview of Wolsey and Campeius with Katherine ( 1529); dissimulation of Wolsey, displeasure of the king ( 1529); return of Campeius to Rome ( 1529); marriage of Henry and Anne ( 1532, according to Holinshed); Katherine named Princess Dowager as the widow of Prince Arthur ( 1533); Wolsey's aspirations to the papacy ( 1529); interception of Wolsey's papers by the king (unhistorical, but based upon a mischance that befell Thomas Ruthal, Bishop of Durham, in which Wolsey had a hand); fall of Wolsey ( 1529); Sir Thomas More made Lord Chancellor ( 1529); Cranmer made Archbishop of Canterbury ( 1533).
IV. Coronation of Queen Anne ( 1533); death of Wolsey ( 1530); death of Queen Katherine ( 1536).
V. Conspiracy against Cranmer ( 1544); birth of Princess Elizabeth ( 1533); Cranmer's appearance before the Council ( 1544); baptism of Princess Elizabeth ( 1533).
SUGGESTED REFERENCES
CAMPBELL LILY B. Shakespeare's Histories: Mirrors of Elizabethan Policy. San Marino, Huntington Library, 1947.

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The Backgrounds of Shakespeare's Plays
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations vii
  • 1 - Shakespeare's Life in Fact and Tradition 1
  • Suggested References 32
  • 2 - Shakespeare's England 33
  • Suggested References 61
  • 3 - The Drama Before Shakespeare 63
  • Suggested References 89
  • 4 - Elizabethan Theatrical Companies 92
  • Suggested References 114
  • 5 - The Elizabethan Public Playhouse 115
  • Suggested References 144
  • 6 - The Influence of Theatrical Conditions on Shakespeare 146
  • Suggested References 166
  • 7 - Shakespeare's Audience 167
  • Suggested References 185
  • 8 - Shakespeare's English 186
  • Suggested References 219
  • 9 - The Sources of Shakespeare's Play 220
  • Suggested References 245
  • 10 - Some General Aspects Of Shakespeare's Dramatic Art 247
  • Suggested References 265
  • 11 - Shakespearean Comedy 268
  • Suggested References 291
  • 12 - Shakespeare's History Plays 293
  • Suggested References 320
  • 13 - Shakespearean Tragedy 322
  • Suggested References 341
  • 14 - Shakespeare in Print 343
  • Suggested References 371
  • 15 - Shakespeare's Reputation 374
  • Suggested References 404
  • 16 - Shakespeare on the Stage 407
  • Suggested References 437
  • 17 - Shakespearean Scenes and Characters 439
  • Index 471
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