CHAPTER V
LOGICAL ATOMISM AND MIND (i)

MR. RUSSELL'S conception of mind descends philosophically from Hume, though there are perceptible relics of Locke in it. It closely resembles that of the psychologists whom we discussed in the last chapter; indeed, although Mr. Russell claims to be interested in psychology more for the light it may throw on the problem of knowledge than for its own sake,1 his Analysis of Mind is largely a critical development of their doctrines on the basis of his own philosophy of physics. He is, however, far more explicit than Hume or the psychologists as to the method he proposes to use, and therein lies the main interest of all Mr. Russell's philosophical work. Mr. Russell's philosophy has for its chief purpose the justification of mathematics and physics, and since he has called it the philosophy of analysis, we must try to discover what he means by analysis before we watch him analysing mind. His source of inspiration is mathematics, and he states the general nature of mathematical analysis clearly enough in the beginning of his Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy.

We may either start, says Mr. Russell, from the most familiar notions of mathematics and proceed deductively by construction towards gradually increasing complexity -- from integers, for example, to fractions, real numbers, and complex numbers, and from addition and multiplication to differentiation, integration, and the higher mathematics. Or else we may proceed in the opposite direction by analysis towards increasing abstractness and logical simplicity, seeking for more general ideas and principles in terms of which we can define or deduce what was our startingpoint. When Greek geometers passed from empirical rules of

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1
Analysis of Mind, p. 15. On the question how he relates psychology to the theory of knowledge see p. 115.

-85-

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