CHAPTER VI
LOGICAL ATOMISM AND MIND (ii)

MR. RUSSELL has so far been analysing mind in accordance with the title of the work which we are discussing. On the other hand, he has also been reconstructing mind by deduction from the products of his analysis.1 But this reconstruction has been a very cautious affair. It is curbed by Mr. Russell's firm empiricist belief in the superiority of knowledge by direct acquaintance, in any sphere where that is possible, to any other sort of knowledge. We reach by analysis bare particulars, or at any rate particulars as bare as empirical experience permits, and any inference, even any construction, which we make from them is bound to be more dubitable than these directly known particulars. In mathematics, where there are no empirical data, this diminution of certainty as deduction advances is doubtless far less of an obstacle to progress, but in the sphere of mind Mr. Russell's loyalty to empiricism ties him to a hesitant and often baffling procedure. He achieves his effects more often by ostensible destruction of other views than by any positive advance.

We know, then, pretty well what to expect as Mr. Russell ascends the traditional scale of mental activities. He will call them phenomena rather than activities or operations, because they must be objectified and empirically observed. By the necessity of his initial hypothesis he must construct them out of particular sensations and images in external relation, and these constructions must not be allowed to form any sort of system exhibiting a character of its own not possessed by its constituent particulars. By Occam's principle, which rests on respect for direct observation, he must not only prefer construction to inference, but also be as sparing of constructions as he can, and define each phase of mind at the lowest possible level -- or, it might be fairer to say, as near as possible to bare particulars. How, if their relations are

____________________
1
See p. 92, footnote I.

-101-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Retreat from Truth
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 255

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.