The Growth of Philosophic Radicalism

By Elie Halévy; Mary Morris | Go to book overview

FOREWORD

ON the one hand the development of the physical sciences, the discovery of Newton's principle which made it possible to found on a single law a complete science of nature, and the conception of the hope of discovering an analogous principle capable of serving for the establishment of a synthetic science of the phenomena of moral and social life; on the other hand a profound crisis in society, a crisis which was itself due in part to the development of science and to the progress of its practical applications, a crisis which called for transformations of the judicial, economic, and political régimes and gave rise to schemes for reform and to reformers without number, a crisis, finally, which demanded a single principle capable of uniting into a single theoretic whole so many scattered notions: -- these are the general causes of the formation of Philosophical Radicalism. They had been at work since the eighteenth century; but the Utilitarian doctrine had not as yet assumed its definitive shape. Bentham, who was already the author of a complete code, a View of a Complete Body of Legislation, did not become famous as a reformer of the science of law till the early years of the following century. Twenty-five years of crisis come between the two extreme periods of his life: the one previous to 1789 when, still unknown, he was a philosopher of the eighteenth century, in the style of Voltaire, Hume, Helvetius and Beccaria; the other subsequent to 1815, when he was the theorist of a party of democratic agitation organised according to the methods peculiar to the nineteenth century.

It is therefore necessary in order to describe the formation of Philosophical Radicalism first to explain the original state through which the Utilitarian doctrine passed in the eighteenth century. How did it come about that Bentham was destined by his own genius, and by circumstances more or less special, eventually to be the head of the school? The circumstances which explain this fact are complex and various; and the progress of the doctrine did not come about in all points with the same speed or according to the same law.

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Growth of Philosophic Radicalism
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 554

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.