The Growth of Philosophic Radicalism

By Elie Halévy; Mary Morris | Go to book overview

CHAPTER I
THE NATURAL LAWS OF ECONOMIC SOCIETY

IT is instructive to compare the state of philosophic and scientific opinion in England and in Germany about the year 1820. In Germany, the thinkers who were forming public opinion were philosophers who believed that they had discovered a synthetic form of speculation, more comprehensive than any special discipline, and such that it would satisfy at once all the needs of the spirit, of the sentimental and the rational, the poetic and the positive, the religious and the scientific. In England, the thinkers who were in the public eye adopted, on the contrary, a point of view which they systematically chose as being as harrow and as exclusive as possible: they looked at man under one aspect only, as a member of economic society, as a producer and consumer of wealth, and they devoted themselves to the methodical definition of the economic categories. In France, there were enthusiastic followers of both schools. To Victor Cousin, the admirer of Germany, Germany was the home of metaphysical speculation. To Jean-Baptiste Say, the admirer of England, England was the home of political economy. In addition to this, both German metaphysicians and English economists quarrelled amongst themselves; and these disputes dismayed Victor Cousin and Jean-Baptiste Say; they threatened to obscure the points on which agreement was fundamental to all, and to compromise, in the world at large, the prestige of German metaphysics, and of English political economy.

In England, it was the economists who opened the campaign against the laws regarding the importation of corn, against the navigation laws, and against the whole system of customs' protections and prohibitions. Until the re-establishment of peace, discussions on political economy had barely passed the bounds of a narrow circle of philosophers. Now, at last, public opinion did justice to the grea

-316-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Growth of Philosophic Radicalism
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 554

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.