Life and Letters of Joel Barlow, LL.D., Poet, Statesman, Philosopher: With Extracts from His Works and Hitherto Unpublished Poems

By Charles Burr Todd | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IV.
1783-1788.

HE at once fixed his abode at Hartford, the little capital on the Connecticut, even then the seat of a refined and cultivated society. His career there was a complex one, exhibiting many phases. He soon abandoned the plan of an early publication of his poem, probably from the shortness of his subscription-list, and also perhaps with a view to a more careful revision. He studied law, however, wrote a great deal of poetry, annuals, NewYear's verses, bon mots, political squibs and satires, hymns and paraphrases of the Psalms, and with Elisha Babcock, a substantial printer of the town, established a weekly newspaper, called The American Mercury -- a scholarly, thoroughly respectable sheet, with a mild bias toward republicanism, or what later came to be thus designated. The office copy of this periodical is preserved in the library of Yale College, the first number bearing date July 12, 1784. Modern newspaper readers would regard it much as the archaeologist looks on Cypriote antiquities. Perhaps we cannot better describe it than by presenting the prospectus, which was as follows:

" Barlow and Babcock have established a new printingoffice near the State House in the city of Hartford. They propose publishing a weekly paper, entitled The American Mercury. As they have a prospect of a very extended circulation and constituency they will exert their utmost abilities to furnish a useful and elegant entertainment for the different classes of their customers. The paper will be a sheet of white, demi-imperial, with an elegant new type, published every Monday morning, and delivered to subscribers in the city at eight shillings the year, one-

-46-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Life and Letters of Joel Barlow, LL.D., Poet, Statesman, Philosopher: With Extracts from His Works and Hitherto Unpublished Poems
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Introductory Note. iii
  • Joel Barlow. 1
  • Chapter II - 1778-1780. 10
  • Chapter III - 1780-1783. 24
  • Chapter IV - 1783-1788. 46
  • Chapter V - 1788-1795. 55
  • Chapter VI - 1795-1797. 115
  • Chapter VII - 1797-1805. 151
  • Chapter VIII - 1805-1811. 204
  • Chapter IX - 1811-1813. 256
  • Chapter X - Personal. 289
  • Index. 305
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 306

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.