The Development of the Drama

By Brander Matthews | Go to book overview

V.
THE DRAMA IN SPAIN

I

IN the middle ages a simple sort of drama had been slowly evolved out of the liturgy of the church; it had grown sturdily until in time it was strong enough to stand on its own feet; it took over the primitive farce of the strolling jesters and thus supplied itself with the comic contrast needful in any adequate representation of life; it spoke the language of the people and it embodied their beliefs and their aspirations; in short, altho it was as yet clumsily inartistic and frankly unliterary, it was at least alive; and it had won its right to survive. A single brief scene acted in the church, by the priests themselves, and in Latin, had slowly led to the performance of a sequence of scenes, in the vernacular, by laymen, outside of the church. The mystery, which was a sequence of scenes in the life of Jesus, had a rival in the miracle-play, which was a sequence of scenes in the life of some wonder-working saint. Disregarding the invisible line that divided the sacred

-147-

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The Development of the Drama
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • I - The Art of the Dramatist 1
  • II - Greek Tragedy 38
  • III - Greek and Roman Comedy 74
  • IV - The Medieval Drama 107
  • V - The Drama in Spain 147
  • VI - The Drama in England 186
  • VII - The Drama in France 227
  • VIII - The Drama in the Eighteenth Century 263
  • IX - The Drama in the Nineteenth Century 296
  • X - The Future of the Drama 325
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