Cicero: A Sketch of His Life and Works

By Hannis Taylor | Go to book overview

CONTENTS

CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION

PAGE
Twenty centuries of fame and influence; Cicero, "the herald of1
antiquity."1
His works the unpremeditated outcome of his career; the Forum2
as a popular university; Tyrrell's brilliant tribute; great days of
Cicero and Hortensius.3
Cicero as a moral teacher; De Republica; De Legibus; De Finibus;3
Tusculanae Disputationes; De Officiis; their author does not
belong to the "classicists."4
Cicero's relation to Stoicism; ideal world-state; God as source of5
natural law; fatherhood of God and brotherhood of man.5
Stoic ideal of a good citizen; rewards in a life beyond the grave;6
definitions of immortality.6
Cicero's influence on the early Christian church; St. Paul, Chrysip-7
pus and Aratus; St. Paul's "Stoic ways of thinking," Pantaenus,
Clemens, and Origenes; Minucius Felix; Lactantius; Tertullian;
St. Ambrose's Christian ethics; St. Jerome's dream; St. Augus
tine; influence of Hortensius; contained everything but name of
Christ; Soliloquies; The City of God; analysis of third book of
De Republica; Stoic ethics as substructure of Christian ethics.13
Stoic influence on Roman law.13
Number and scope of Cicero's extant works; inaccessible to the14
many; Ruskin's comment on books made for all time.15
Beneath every document there was a man; Cicero, "the pen and15
mirror of a great transition."16
Cicero as a wit; his charge against Volumnius; collection of witti-17
cisms circulated after his death; inventor of a philosophical ter
minology; his invaluable correspondence; necessity for an
anthology.19

CHAPTER II STOIC PHILOSOPHY AND ROMAN LAW

Failure of the Greeks to produce a philosophy of law; jurispru-21
dence a Roman creation.21
Roman law as a factor in civilization; as an element in English22
law; Grotius and the jus gentium; Cicero and the jus gentium.23
City-state as defined by Aristotle; class of codes to which Twelve23
Tables belonged.24

-xix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Cicero: A Sketch of His Life and Works
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 615

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.