Democracy and the Eastern Question: The Problem of the Far East as Demonstrated by the Great War, and Its Relation to the United States of America

By Thomas F. Millard | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VIII
THE CORRUPTION OF A NATION
Increase of Japan's influence in China--The revised Japanese policy-- Its motives and methods--China's wish to participate in the war--How it was defeated--American loan refused--Effects of this refusal--Corruption of Chinese officials--Getting control of the Government--The War Participation Board--The military agreement--Advent of Nishihara--The orgy of loans--Japan's two--faced policy--Attitude of other powers--The rake's progress--Sowing seeds of internal dissension-- Japan in Shantung--Establishment of civil administration there--Protests of the Chinese inliabitants--The question analysed--Japan's objects revealed--Forced sale of Chinese lands--Fraudulent seizure of mines-- Survey of Japanese "penetration" of Tsinan-fu--Brothels and drug-shops --Where the money came from--Refastening the opium trade on China-- Japan's illicit trade in morphia--How the trade is conducted--Explanations of the Japanese Government--Exploiting the Chinese bandits.

AN immediate effect of the Lansing-Ishii Agreement in China, where its beneficial purposes were presumed to apply solely, was to raise Japanese influence at Peking to an unprecedented degree. The strongest man in the existing Government, Tuan Chi-jui, premier and leader of the military party, already was obligated financially to Japanese banks for help in regaining his position. There had for some time been a pro-Japan group in Chinese politics composed partly of men who honestly believed that China's best policy was to follow Japan, and partly of men who had taken that side for financial inducements. When the Lansing- Ishii notes were published, the pro-Japan element in Chinese official circles went about saying: "I told you so. We always said that no dependence could be placed in America." After China had planned active participation in the war on the expectation of a loan from the American Government,

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