William L. Wilson and Tariff Reform, a Biography

By Festus P. Summers | Go to book overview

CHAPTER I
A Mind in the Making [1843-1862]

WILLIAM LYNE WILSON was born on a farm near Smithfield, Jefferson County, Virginia (now West Virginia), May 3, 1843. Smithfield was one of those unforgettable country places which derive importance from location rather than size. A mere cluster of farmhouses nestling by the roadside, it was the halfway point between Charles Town and the historic Shenandoah Valley Turnpike. Long since it had taken on the inevitable pseudonym Middleway. Nor was this all. Smithfield was one of those favored spots of earth about which legends very quickly gather. Thanks to a precious tale of the golden past that witches had once cut to shreds the clothing of lodgers while they slept at its way­ side inn, the drowsy village had for uncounted years borne the Sleepy- Hollowish name "Clip."1

That part of the Shenandoah Valley which gave birth to Wilson had long been historic, and the John Brown affair at Harpers Ferry, the campaigns of Lee, Jackson, and Early, and the spoliations of Northern invasion were yet to come. Founded in 1801 and named for the third President, the county so fittingly called Jefferson had been in truth at the time of its formation the land of Washington. George Washington was its largest landowner before the Revolution2 and members of Washington's immediate family, more prolific it seems than was "The Father of His Country," occupied some of its very choice acres. Charles Town, the seat of county government, was named in honor of Charles Washington, a brother of the President, who had acquired no small part of the George Washington holding and erected upon it a suitable plantation house which he named "Happy Retreat." On an extensive

____________________
1
Robert L. Bates, A History of Middleway (MS).
2
Roy Bird Cook, Washington's Western Lands, pp. 147, 152; New York World, February 11, 1894.

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
William L. Wilson and Tariff Reform, a Biography
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 294

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.