The Growth of American Thought

By Merle Curti | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I wish to thank the following publishers for permission to quote from books or periodicals bearing their imprint: Little, Brown and Co. ( Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., The Common Law); Charles Scribner's Sons ( William N. Clark, Sixty Years with the Bible); Harper & Brothers ( Hamlin Garland, Main Travelled Roads and The Public Papers of Woodrow Wilson); The Chautauqua Institution ( John H. Vincent , The Chautauqua Movement); McFadden Publications, Inc., ( True Story), the Essex Institute ( Harriet S. Tapley, Salem Imprints, 1768-1825); the University of Maine Studies ( Laura G. M. Pedder, ed., The Letters of Joseph Dennie); and Constable and Co. ( The Works of Herman Melville). I also appreciate permission to quote from the Secret Diary of William Byrd II, edited by Louis B. Wright and Marion Tinling.

It is impossible to express my specific indebtedness to everyone who has in one way or another contributed to this book. I am indebted to Louis C. Hunter, Charles A. Barker, Richard Hofstadter, William Miller, Thomas C. Cochran, John and LaWanda Cox, and Howard K. Beale for reading the manuscript and for making valuable detailed suggestions and stimulating general criticisms. Charles A. Beard has read the whole manuscript and given it a searching criticism, for which I am very grateful. Guy Stanton Ford has encouraged me throughout the undertaking and has made many helpful suggestions. One or more chapters were read by Clement Eaton, Theodore Hornberger, Theodore Brameld, Fulmer Mood, Erling M. Hunt, Richard Thursfield, Norris F. Hall, and Harold U. Faulkner. I should also like to thank for their comments on the outline or on certain problems which I posed, Kenneth W. Porter, Robert E. Riegel and Harold J. Laski; my former colleagues at Columbia University, especially Marjorie H. Nicolson, J. Montgomery Gambrill, Arthur E. Bestor,

-xv-

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