The Growth of American Thought

By Merle Curti | Go to book overview

Bibliographical Note

This volume rests both on monographic studies and on primary sources. In some chapters my own researches have been drawn upon extensively. Primary sources in the field of intellectual history which have been used in one or another section of this synthesis and interpretation include files of periodicals and newspapers, government documents, reminiscences and memoirs, letters both published and unpublished, academic addresses, Fourth of July orations, belles- lettres, and such "sub-literature" as almanacs and dime novels.

Footnotes have been included only in the case of direct quotations, for the most part. I shall be glad to furnish any inquirer with references to the material on which the treatment of any topic is based.

The following bibliographical notes deal chiefly with the monographic literature to which I am especially indebted and which seems particularly useful for the further study of a given topic. These titles are representative and selective rather than exhaustive and are intended primarily for the inquiring student rather than for the scholar.


I. A Variety of Peoples Bequeath Legacies to the New Nation

The contribution of English-speaking colonists to the intellectual life of the nation is treated in general terms in William Cunningham's English Influence on the United States ( Putnam, 1916). For the history of the English language in the colonies two studies are available: George P. Krapp, The English Language in America ( Appleton- Century, 1925, 2 vols.), and Henry L. Mencken, The American Language ( Knopf, 1936). For the patterns of English education which influenced colonial development Arthur F. Leach English Schools at the Reformation, 1546-1648 ( Westminster, 1896) is a standard account. Louis B. Wright richly documented Middle Class Culture in Elizabethan England ( University of North Carolina Press, 1935) provides an indispensable background for understanding English cultural influences in the colonial era. The best introduction to English law in the colonies is Richard B. Morris, Studies in the History of American Law ( Columbia University Press, 1930). The literature on English political ideas in colonial intellectual history is voluminous. CharlesH. McIlwain

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