The Growth of American Thought

By Merle Curti | Go to book overview

Index
Abbot, Francis, 559
Abbott, Lyman, 551, 673
Adair, James, 260
Adamic, Louis, quoted, 719
Adams, Abigail, 167
Adams, Charles Francis, 521, 569
Adams, Charles K., 585
Adams, Hannah, 167
Adams, Henry, 208, 456, 521, 522, 548, 568-569, 585, 707
Adams, Herbert Baxter, 568, 594, 602
Adams, James Truslow, 508
Adams, John, 49, 65, 119, 166, 185 (quoted), 187, 188, 192; on deism, 111-112; and the Enlightenment, 124; argues for aristocracy, 140, 191; on bloodshed, 188; on property, 189; criticizes democracy, 190-191; on infidelity, 199
Adams, John Quincy, 214, 223, 227, 322, 329, 373, 665
Addams, Jane, 603, 676
Addison, Joseph, 35, 42, 235
Adgate, Andrew, 139
Adler, Felix, 564
Adler, Mortimer, 733
Adrian, Robert, 222
Aeronautics, 546-547
Agassiz, Louis, 315, 320, 359, 367, 469, 549
Agriculture, scientific, 29-30, 183-184, 322, 438
Aiken, Robert, 146
Alcott, Bronson, 537
Alcott, Louisa May, 748
Aldrich, Thomas Bailey, 520
Alexander, Franz, 779
Alger, Horatio, 646-648
Allen, Ethan, 141, 157-158
Almanacs, 34-35, 90
Alsop, Richard, 188, 204
American Academy of Arts, 228
American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 45, 254, 326
American Academy of Fine Arts, 354
American Academy of Letters, 228
American Antiquarian Society, 227
American Association for the Advancement of Science, 327, 462, 586-587
American Association of University Professors, 588
American Bible Society, 202
American Century, 796-797
American Council of Learned Societies, 682
American culture, criticized by intellectuals, 522 ff.; influence on Europe, 419, 689-690 See also Art; Literature; Music; Science, etc.
American destiny, 412-413, 659-660, 662- 667, 795 ff. See also Imperialism
"American dream," 508, 716
American Federation of Labor, 618, 624, 625
American Historical Association, 733
American language, 49, 153 ff., 177, 234- 235
American Medical Association, 339
American Philosophical Society, 30, 42, 46, 92, 163, 206, 244, 254, 326
American Psychological Association, 725
American Revolution, 26, 83, 85; intellectual losses, 129 ff.; and the Enlightenment, 129, 155; stimulus to intellectual life, 134 ff.; and anti-slavery sentiment, 137-138; and esthetics, 139 ff.; stimulates nationalism in intellectual life, 143 ff.; and historiography, 152 ff.
American Tract Society, 273
American traits, of Indians, 18, 19, 20, 497, 498; of Negroes, 24, 432-433, 475,

-877-

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