In the Shadow of Russia: Eastern Europe in the Postwar World

By Nicholas Halasz | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TWO
Rumania

On October 9, 1944, Churchill arrived in Moscow for an urgent "meeting of minds" with Stalin.

British troops had landed in Greece to insure order in the wake of the retreating Nazis. Two resistance groups ruled the country, each administering the parts under its sway-most of the left wing being led by Communists. The British brought the two groups under the same roof in a "government of national unity," gave it authority, and prevented Left and Right from clashing in civil war. But the leftist resistance and the right-wing guerilla forces accepted temporary unity only in order to take part in the control of the distribution of emergency supplies the British were unloading for the famine-threatened population. Both groups watched jealously that this aid should not favor the rival territory.

Greece was the Balkan country at war whose rugged shores reached into the Eastern Mediterranean, a zone of vital interest for Britain. The impoverished country seethed with hatred of the king and the dictatorship he cloaked under royal authority. The people held him responsible for the hardships of foreign occupation and war, and the great majority supported the left-wing resistance. If left alone, the Greeks would have set up a pro-Communist government, but Churchill was not inclined to tolerate a Soviet outpost which would place British Middle East interests in jeopardy. Stalin alone, he thought, was able to impose

-54-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
In the Shadow of Russia: Eastern Europe in the Postwar World
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface v
  • Contents ix
  • Part I - The Seven States 1
  • Chapter One - Poland 3
  • Chapter Two - Rumania 54
  • Chapter Three - Bulgaria 90
  • Chapter Four - Jugoslavia 110
  • Chapter Five - Albania 143
  • Chapter Six - Hungary 150
  • Chapter Seven - Czecho-Slovakia 190
  • Part II - Eastern Europe in the Cold War 231
  • Chapter Eight - The Cold War Years 233
  • Chapter Nine - The Ice Breaks 317
  • A Note on Sources 379
  • Index 381
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 390

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.