Lincoln and the Bluegrass: Slavery and Civil War in Kentucky

By William H. Townsend | Go to book overview

Illustrations
Abraham Lincoln
FRONTISPIECE
Transylvania. University in the 1820's; Title page of The Kentucky Preceptor that Lincoln studied; Thomas Lincoln testifies how his brother spelled his name BETWEEN PAGE 10 AND 11
Thomas Lincoln's stillhouse near Lexington; "Ellerslie," home of Levi Todd, as it looked just before it was razed; Robert S. Todd BETWEEN PAGES 26 AND 27
Receipts signed by Lincoln for Denton Offutt; The Rutledge mill and Denton Offutt's store at New Salem, rebuilt on the original sites BETWEEN PAGES 42 AND 43
Mary Ann Todd; Home of "Widow" Parker, Mary Todd's grandmother, as it looks today; The confectionery of Monsieur Giron; Dr. Ward's Academy BETWEEN PAGES 58 AND 59
Sale of "bucks" and "wenches" on Cheapside; Slave cabins in the Bluegrass BETWEEN PAGES 74 AND 75
Reward for runaway slave; Slave auction on Cheapside BETWEEN PAGES 90 AND 91
One of the brass cannon used in the defense of The True American office; Cassius M. Clay BETWEEN PAGES 106 AND 107
Main Street in Lexington as Lincoln saw it; Slave auction in the courthouse yard; The home of Robert S. Todd, as it looks today BETWEEN PAGES 122 AND 123
"Nigger Trader" advertisements; Slave shackles BETWEEN PAGES 138 AND 139

-xiii-

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Lincoln and the Bluegrass: Slavery and Civil War in Kentucky
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • Illustrations xiii
  • One - Athens of the West 1
  • Two - The Lincolns of Fayette 16
  • Three - The Early Todds 25
  • Four - The Little Trader from Hickman Creek 30
  • Five - Mary Ann Todd 46
  • Six - Slavery in the Bluegrass 70
  • Seven - Grist to the Mill 81
  • Eight - The True American 99
  • Nine - The Lincolns Visit Lexington 120
  • Ten - Widow Sprigg and Buena Vista 141
  • Eleven - A House Divided 157
  • Twelve - Milly and Alfred 176
  • Thirteen - The Buried Years 192
  • Fourteen - Storm Clouds 209
  • Fifteen - Rebellion 239
  • Sixteen - Stirring Days in Kentucky 269
  • Seventeen Problems of State and In-Law Trouble 299
  • Eighteen - With Malice Toward None 320
  • Nineteen - Lilac Time 352
  • Bibliographical Notes 359
  • Index 387
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