CHAPTER VI
STRUCTURE AND STRATEGY

Explanation of the Diagram and Instruction for Use

The Diagram represents Linguistic Philosophy as a system made up of interlocking, mutually supporting parts.

Each box encloses a doctrine, idea, practice, rule, value or other constituent which plays a significant part in the maintenance of the intellectual atmosphere of Linguistic Philosophy.

Straight lines connecting boxes indicate support, a possible line of argument or transition, between the ideas, etc., contained in the connected boxes.

Jagged lines between boxes indicate incompatibility or strain between the ideas, etc., contained in the boxes so connected.

The most important starting points within this self-contained system have boxes with black margins.

Of these, three are due to Wittgenstein (denial of pre-eminent language, the game model of language, and Polymorphism), one to G. E. Moore (common sense is right), one to Logical Positivism (Factual--grammatical exclusive dichotomy), and one (argument from impotence) originates from no individual thinker but from some general background.


Suggested Parlour Games

The reader who wishes to teach himself to expound Linguistic Philosophy should pick any square at random and then proceed along straight lines to other squares of his choice, until exhausted. The arguments connecting the contents of the boxes are generally obvious.

The reader may also wish to learn to defend Linguistic Philosophy. He should, again, pick some box at random and assume it to have been refuted. He must then concentrate on showing that the remaining boxes, or some favoured set of them, are quite self-sufficient without the abandoned box, and indeed that

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Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Acknowledgements 7
  • Contents 9
  • Introduction 13
  • Chapter I - Of Linguistic Philosophy 17
  • Chapter II - Of Language 27
  • Chapter III - Of Philosophy 57
  • Chapter IV - Of the World 99
  • Chapter V - Of Knowledge 120
  • Chapter VI - Structure and Strategy 159
  • Chapter VII - Assessment 193
  • Chapter VIII - Implications 220
  • Chapter IX - Sociology 229
  • Chapter X - Conclusion 263
  • Index 267
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