The Law of International Institutions

By D. W. Bowett | Go to book overview

B. ORGANISATIONS OF LIMITED COMPETENCE

CHAPTER 4
THE SPECIALISED AGENCIES

I. INTRODUCTION

THE process by which various organisations, some in existence prior to the setting up of the United Nations and some created afterwards, were brought into relationship with the United Nations has already been described.1 We now turn to the examination of these "specialised agencies" in order to see the varying constitutional forms and techniques which have been adopted; it will soon be apparent that the constitutional form of the United Nations is by no means the only feasible form for a global institution. However, since a good deal of the variation in constitutional form depends upon a variation in function, it will be useful, first, to summarise the aims and functions of each of the agencies.


International Labour Organisation (ILO)

This originally formed part of the League of Nations system, and its constitution was to be found in Part XIII of the Treaty of Versailles; it was, however, an autonomous institution, like the P.C.I;J., yet its links with the League made amendment of its constitution necessary upon the dissolution of the League. The constitution was thus amended by the International Labour Conference at Montreal in October 1946,2 its aims being widened and a new relationship with the UN anticipated. The principal aim, as set forth in the Preamble, is the improvement of conditions of labour; this is to be achieved, for example, by the regulation of hours of work, regulation of the labour supply and the prevention of unemployment, protection of the worker against sickness and industrial injury, recognition of the principle of equal remuneration for work of equal value, recognition of the principle of freedom of association and the organisation of vocational and technical education.

____________________
1
Ante. p. 55.
2
And again in 1953, the later amendment entering into force on May 20, 1954: see U.K. Treaty Series, No. 59 ( 1961), Cmnd. 1428.

-93-

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