The Grand Domestic Revolution: A History of Feminist Designs for American Homes, Neighborhoods, and Cities

By Dolores Hayden | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

The Radcliffe Institute provided the intellectual excitement and exchange which sustained me in 1976 and 1977 as I began to explore the importance of women's history for a full understanding of the politics of housing design. A fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities and a Rockefeller Humanities Fellowship provided funds for this research. The Department of Architecture at MIT and the Urban Planning Program at UCLA offered research and secretarial assistance, and funds to acquire photographs.

My thanks go to many individuals, but first of all, to Peter Marris. He read and criticized many drafts of these chapters and often discussed the progress of the book with me. As an urban sociologist, he offered innumerable insights; as my husband, he shared the labor in our home while I researched the kitchenless houses of the past. I would also like to thank my colleagues at UCLA, Kathryn Kish Sklar, whose book on Catharine Beecher stimulated my interest in domestic reform, and Temma Kaplan, whose work on anarchism, socialism, and feminism encouraged me to define my own ideas about ideology. Both of them read the entire manuscript as well as extensive revisions. They made many important critical and theoretical suggestions. So did Jeremy Brecher, whose studies of the many forms of rank and file workers' protest I admire; Alice Kessler Harris, whose broad knowledge of women's history and labor history saved me from many naive assumptions; and Mari Jo Buhle, whose wide knowledge of socialist

-viii-

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