Australian External Policy under Labor: Content, Process and the National Debate

By Henry S. Albinski | Go to book overview

organ, National Message, carried the captions "Freedom, Justice and Democracy under God" and "God Save the Queen". In the December 1974 Queensland state election, a Bjelke-Petersen campaign leitmotiv was admonitory about the spectre of communism in Canberra. There had been sell-outs to communists at home and abroad, the doing of despicable deals with those who would ruin and enslave Australia, among them the Russians, the Chinese and the North Vietnamese. 70

The DLP had for many years been a paramount publicist for a rightwing approach to external policy. In the 1974 election, though more forcefully in Victoria than in New South Wales, it continued to warn against dangers in Asia and urged vigilance and preparedness in defence. In that election, it lost all of its federal parliamentary representation. The loss of its Senate forum considerably weakened its ability to project its views on the country or to continue to leave whatever very little imprint it still could on the L-CP. The DLP's 1974 setback was very disheartening to B. A. Santamaria and his National Civic Council. Santamaria complained of "the Liberals having adopted the essence of the policies fastened on Labor by D. Cirns and the Left". 71 Santamaria felt that, if anything because of the removal of the DLP from the federal parliamentary scene, it was imperative for those who understood and who cared to keep the external policy failings of the "identikit" Labor and Liberal Parties before the public. In time, the somnolent Australian people would rue the day they lost perspective: on communism, on an unbalanced world order, on their frail security shield and ultimately on their own safety. Some of Santamaria's formulations, such as finding a linkage between a red aligning Jim Cairns and a badly duped Bill Snedden or Andrew Peacock, were most notable for their shock value, or their appeal to true believers. But Santamaria remained among the most informed and trenchant publicists of a distinctive, right-oriented alternative to Labor's outlook on foreign policy. 72


NOTES
1.
E. G. Whitlam, "Australian's Foreign Policy: New Directions, New Definitions", 24th Roy Milne Memorial Lecture, Brisbane, 30 November 1973, ( Melbourne: AIIA, 1973), p. 3.
2.
Commonwealth [Australian] Parliamentary Debates (APD), House of Representatives (HR) ( 22 April 1971), p. 1925.
3.
Australia and South-East Asia, ( Canberra: Department of Foreign Affairs, 1974), p. 35.
4.
D. Willesee (untitled paper, AIIA conference, Adelaide, June 1974), pp. 6-7.
5.
Whitlam, address of 3 December 1973; and Department of Foreign Affairs, Circular Memorandum, no. 109/ 73 ( 5 December 1973).
6.
Department of Foreign Affairs, Circular Memorandum, no. 109/ 73 ( 5 December 1973).
7.
Canberra Times, 3 May 1974.
8.
Australian Foreign Affairs Record (AFAR) 44 ( August 1973): 530.

-89-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Australian External Policy under Labor: Content, Process and the National Debate
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - The Liberal Inheritance: I 1
  • Notes 25
  • 2 - The Liberal Inheritance: II 28
  • Notes 57
  • 3 - Australia and the International Scene 60
  • Notes 89
  • 4 - External Policy: Diplomatic Dimensions: I 92
  • Notes 120
  • 5 - External Policy: Diplomatic Dimensions: II 124
  • Notes 173
  • 6 - External Policy: Economic Dimensions 178
  • Notes 219
  • 7 - External Policy: Defence Dimensions 225
  • Notes 268
  • 8 - The External Policy Process 274
  • Notes 317
  • 9 - Electoral Politics and External Policy 321
  • Notes 352
  • Bibliography 355
  • Index 359
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 378

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.