The Foreign Policy of Castlereagh, 1812-1815, Britain and the European Alliance

By Thomas Lawrence ; C. J. Bartlett | Go to book overview

3
India and the liar against
Napoleon 1802-9

In the leisurely manner of the early nineteenth century, several weeks elapsed before the transfer of power from Pitt to Addington was completed. Castlereagh was able to use this interval to make a favourable impression as a government spokesman; when he subsequently spoke as a private member he was already a marked man, and few were surprised when Addington offered him the Presidency of the Board of Control in June 1802. Although Pitt was still encouraging his supporters to assist the government, Castlereagh's acceptance represented a considerable change from his original attitude to the new ministry. With Pitt committed to the postponement of the Catholic question during the King's lifetime, Castlereagh was not disposed to waste time in idle opposition on behalf of distant and speculative objectives. 1 He did propose state endowment of the Catholic clergy of Ireland to Addington, but did not press the matter.

The Board of Control was not an easy office. It had been established by Pitt in 1784 in an endeavour to form a working relationship between the British government and the East India Company in the management of British interests in India. Some state intervention had become necessary to meet the growing discontent with the Company's conduct in India, and also in recognition that the extent of British involvement in the subcontinent had passed beyond the competence of the Company to

____________________
1
Ziegler, Addington, p. 157, draws attention to a story that Castlereagh was indebted to Addington for assistance with debts incurred during the passage of the Union. Addington apparently hoped that Castlereagh would become his right-hand man in the Commons.

-40-

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The Foreign Policy of Castlereagh, 1812-1815, Britain and the European Alliance
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Castlereagh *
  • In Memory of Paul *
  • Contents vii
  • List of Illustrations viii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • 1: The 'Mask' of Castlereagh 1
  • 2: Irish Apprenticeship 1790-1801 6
  • 3: India and the Liar Against Napoleon 1802-9 40
  • 4: The Pittites Without Pitt 1806-12 88
  • 5: Wars and Peace-Making 1812-15 106
  • 6: Leader of the House of Commons 1812-22 162
  • 7: Castlereagh and the 'New Diplomacy' 1816-22 199
  • 8: Castlereagh and the Wider World 235
  • 9: Suicide and Conclusion 259
  • Bibliographical Note 281
  • Index 287
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