of the Western Pacific Islands were not to become British colonies for forty years. Hong Kong had not yet been occupied and Burma, partly annexed in 1852, was not declared wholly British until 1886.

This list of waiting conquests meant little to Britain and nothing to Queen Victoria, who had been taught to consider her island as a neighbour of Europe rather than as the possible master of a new world.

In the summer of 1837 Queen Victoria went to Windsor Castle, a symbol of her greatness. Here, if she had been imaginative, she might have heard ancestral voices, rich with conquest, power and romance, speaking to her from as far back as Norman times. There were splendid lessons for her to learn from the ancient walls behind which eight hundred years of England's history were stored. Of all the voices, the one that might have fired her imagination was that of Elizabeth, who had loved Windsor. The young Queen might have pondered over the similarity of their positions; she could not anticipate that when she would be buried at Windsor, at the end of the century, her name would glow in the story of the island with almost equal brilliance.


{17}

1837

THE English colony in New York had celebrated Princess Victoria's eighteenth birthday with a banquet, not knowing that the King was already dead. The chief speech had been made by no less an hero than Captain Marryat, author of Masterman Ready. He said,

"Your own gallantry will enable you fully to enter into my feelings when I state to you that I have always conceived—and I trust I may say so without being accused of disloyalty—that I could serve a Queen with even greater zeal and fidelity than I could a King. Indeed it would appear that women are more calculated to wield the sceptre than men; for, if we refer to our history, we shall find that England never was so great and so glorious as under the dynasty of our Queens; and that although they sometimes surrendered up their hearts to individuals, they always reserved their heads pro bono publico. "
1

This gesture in New York was confined to a small colony. The American States, interpreting the spirit of the Monroe Doctrine, declared in 1823, were enjoying their freedom and isolating themselves from European affairs. The great new world was expanding and neither the

-42-

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Reign of Queen Victoria
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Reign of Queen Victoria *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Illustrations *
  • Foreword *
  • {1} i
  • {2} 2
  • {3} 4
  • {4} 10
  • {5} 11
  • {6} 14
  • {7} 17
  • {8} 21
  • {9} 23
  • {10} 25
  • {11} 29
  • {12} 30
  • {13} 32
  • {14} 34
  • {15} 37
  • {16} 39
  • {17} 42
  • {18} 44
  • {19} 49
  • {20} 53
  • {21} 54
  • {22} 55
  • {23} 57
  • {24} 60
  • {25} 63
  • {26} 65
  • {27} 67
  • {28} 70
  • {29} 76
  • {30} 79
  • {31} 80
  • {32} 84
  • {33} 87
  • {34} 91
  • {35} 93
  • {36} 103
  • {37} 106
  • {38} 109
  • {39} 110
  • {40} 111
  • {41} 115
  • {42} 116
  • {43} 116
  • {44} 118
  • {45} 119
  • {46} 121
  • {47} 123
  • {48} 124
  • {49} 125
  • {50} 127
  • {51} 128
  • {52} 129
  • {53} 134
  • {54} 136
  • {55} 138
  • {56} 140
  • {57} 141
  • {58} 144
  • {59} 145
  • {60} 146
  • {61} 149
  • {62} 151
  • {63} 153
  • {64} 154
  • {65} 157
  • {66} 158
  • {67} 161
  • {68} 163
  • {69} 165
  • {70} 168
  • {71} 169
  • {72} 172
  • {73} 172
  • {74} 176
  • {75} 178
  • {76} 180
  • {77} 182
  • {78} 185
  • {79} 187
  • {80} 190
  • {81} 194
  • {82} 196
  • {83} 199
  • {84} 204
  • {85} 206
  • {86} 213
  • {87} 216
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  • {89} 221
  • {90} 224
  • {91} 228
  • {92} 230
  • {93} 231
  • {94} 235
  • {95} 237
  • {96} 239
  • {97} 243
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  • {99} 252
  • {100} 256
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  • {103} 265
  • {104} 266
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  • {107} 271
  • {108} 272
  • {109} 274
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  • {111} 278
  • {112} 280
  • {113} 283
  • {114} 285
  • {115} 289
  • {116} 292
  • {117} 296
  • {118} 299
  • {119} 300
  • {120} 301
  • {121} 304
  • {122} 306
  • {123} 310
  • {124} 312
  • {125} 314
  • {126} 315
  • {127} 317
  • {128} 320
  • {129} 322
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  • {132} 326
  • {133} 327
  • {134} 330
  • {135} 331
  • {136} 333
  • {137} 335
  • {138} 338
  • {139} 340
  • {140} 343
  • {141} 346
  • {142} 346
  • {143} 348
  • {144} 349
  • {145} 352
  • {146} 353
  • {147} 356
  • {148} 358
  • {149} 360
  • {150} 361
  • {151} 363
  • {152} 366
  • {153} 369
  • {154} 372
  • {155} 375
  • {156} 377
  • {157} 379
  • Sources and References 383
  • Bibliography 405
  • {Index} 407
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