and sorrow marking the procession of years, Windsor Castle was to become a happy home. The vast quadrangles, towers, and battlemented walls, spread like a town on the crest of the hill, were to be simplified into a house, in which children were to be born and taught their duty.

Evening was falling as the carriage drove into the upper quadrangle of the castle. The walls of the houses in the town "glowed with crowns, stars and all the brilliant devices which gas and oil could supply." Within the castle, after dinner, Queen Victoria wrote in her Journal,

"I and Albert, alone."


{23}

1840

THE Queen and the Prince were up and walking about very early next morning.

"Strange that a bridal night should be so short,"
wrote Greville. The Queen could not control her ecstasy. She stole a minute from Prince Albert's side to write a note to her uncle, describing herself as "the happiest, happiest being that ever existed."
" He is an angel,"
she wrote,
"and his kindness and affection for me is really touching. To look in those dear eyes, and that dear sunny face, is enough to make me adore him. I was a good deal tired last night, but am quite well again to-day, and happy."

A little later, before they went in to luncheon, she slipped away again to write to Baron Stockmar,

"There cannot exist a clearer, purer, nobler being in the world than the Prince."

Prince Albert wrote no letters. He walked through the rooms of Windsor, and looked at the trophies of centuries on the walls. In the library were folios of hundreds of Leonardo da Vinci drawings, in the cupboards were the unsorted documents of hundreds of years: the treasures of many kings, uncatalogued and unidentified. Here was an opportunity for his enterprising, tidy mind. He walked in the park and gardens which were shabby from neglect. Here was another field for his ideas. Among those who watched him was the Duchess of Bedford. She thought he gave the impression of "not being happy," and told Greville later that she believed the Queen was "excessively in love with" the Prince "but he not a bit with her."

The Queen's ecstasy did not prevent her from remembering her

-57-

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Reign of Queen Victoria
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Reign of Queen Victoria *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Illustrations *
  • Foreword *
  • {1} i
  • {2} 2
  • {3} 4
  • {4} 10
  • {5} 11
  • {6} 14
  • {7} 17
  • {8} 21
  • {9} 23
  • {10} 25
  • {11} 29
  • {12} 30
  • {13} 32
  • {14} 34
  • {15} 37
  • {16} 39
  • {17} 42
  • {18} 44
  • {19} 49
  • {20} 53
  • {21} 54
  • {22} 55
  • {23} 57
  • {24} 60
  • {25} 63
  • {26} 65
  • {27} 67
  • {28} 70
  • {29} 76
  • {30} 79
  • {31} 80
  • {32} 84
  • {33} 87
  • {34} 91
  • {35} 93
  • {36} 103
  • {37} 106
  • {38} 109
  • {39} 110
  • {40} 111
  • {41} 115
  • {42} 116
  • {43} 116
  • {44} 118
  • {45} 119
  • {46} 121
  • {47} 123
  • {48} 124
  • {49} 125
  • {50} 127
  • {51} 128
  • {52} 129
  • {53} 134
  • {54} 136
  • {55} 138
  • {56} 140
  • {57} 141
  • {58} 144
  • {59} 145
  • {60} 146
  • {61} 149
  • {62} 151
  • {63} 153
  • {64} 154
  • {65} 157
  • {66} 158
  • {67} 161
  • {68} 163
  • {69} 165
  • {70} 168
  • {71} 169
  • {72} 172
  • {73} 172
  • {74} 176
  • {75} 178
  • {76} 180
  • {77} 182
  • {78} 185
  • {79} 187
  • {80} 190
  • {81} 194
  • {82} 196
  • {83} 199
  • {84} 204
  • {85} 206
  • {86} 213
  • {87} 216
  • {88} 218
  • {89} 221
  • {90} 224
  • {91} 228
  • {92} 230
  • {93} 231
  • {94} 235
  • {95} 237
  • {96} 239
  • {97} 243
  • {98} 245
  • {99} 252
  • {100} 256
  • {101} 260
  • {102} 262
  • {103} 265
  • {104} 266
  • {105} 267
  • {106} 268
  • {107} 271
  • {108} 272
  • {109} 274
  • {110} 276
  • {111} 278
  • {112} 280
  • {113} 283
  • {114} 285
  • {115} 289
  • {116} 292
  • {117} 296
  • {118} 299
  • {119} 300
  • {120} 301
  • {121} 304
  • {122} 306
  • {123} 310
  • {124} 312
  • {125} 314
  • {126} 315
  • {127} 317
  • {128} 320
  • {129} 322
  • {130} 323
  • {131} 324
  • {132} 326
  • {133} 327
  • {134} 330
  • {135} 331
  • {136} 333
  • {137} 335
  • {138} 338
  • {139} 340
  • {140} 343
  • {141} 346
  • {142} 346
  • {143} 348
  • {144} 349
  • {145} 352
  • {146} 353
  • {147} 356
  • {148} 358
  • {149} 360
  • {150} 361
  • {151} 363
  • {152} 366
  • {153} 369
  • {154} 372
  • {155} 375
  • {156} 377
  • {157} 379
  • Sources and References 383
  • Bibliography 405
  • {Index} 407
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