is forgotten — the seditious associations are closed — the priests are frightened and the people are tranquil. "1 He did not remind the Prime Minister that thousands upon thousands of them had left the country in disgust and enmity to cross the Atlantic, that the Queen would meet only those of her Irish subjects who had survived famine or not sought escape from old evils in new lands. The resilient, romantic Irish seemed to forget their rancour in the bells, cannon, and shouts that welcomed the Royal party in Cork. At Waterford, where the Stromboli had anchored a year before to intimidate the lawless Irish, Prince Albert and the heir to the throne sailed quietly past the same Irishmen, in a little boat. The people at Kingstown shouted with joy when they saw the Royal children and a fat old woman cried out,

"Oh! Queen dear! Make one of them Prince Patrick, and all Ireland will die for you. "
2 Four thousand people came to see the Queen and the Prince at the levée in Dublin and six thousand troops marched past them at the review in Phoenix Park.

The Royal yacht steamed on to Scotland where duty ended and pleasure began. The Queen remembered the cry of the woman in Kingstown and made her eldest son Earl of Dublin, but she was pleased to be at Balmoral after

"the brilliant bustle."
Prince Albert wrote to Stockmar,
"Our Irish visit has gone off well beyond all expectation," and added the revealing sentence, "What principally occupies me just now is a plan for the establishment of a free University for Ireland."
Again he could not pass an opportunity for improving the world.

While the Queen was writing,

"It seems like a dream to be here in our dear Highland home again,"
Prince Albert was telling his brother that the Irish reception was
"a most important proof that the only place in our Kingdom which is unhealthy (at least as regards loyalty) is as healthy as all the others."


{40}

1849-1850

FOR nine years Prince Albert had tried to develop his British interests, at the same time clinging to the affairs of Europe. In none of his early letters is there a sign of concern over life across the Atlantic, or in the colonies, except when they added to the troubles of the War Office. He never became wholly conscious of the New World, and Queen

-111-

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Reign of Queen Victoria
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Reign of Queen Victoria *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Illustrations *
  • Foreword *
  • {1} i
  • {2} 2
  • {3} 4
  • {4} 10
  • {5} 11
  • {6} 14
  • {7} 17
  • {8} 21
  • {9} 23
  • {10} 25
  • {11} 29
  • {12} 30
  • {13} 32
  • {14} 34
  • {15} 37
  • {16} 39
  • {17} 42
  • {18} 44
  • {19} 49
  • {20} 53
  • {21} 54
  • {22} 55
  • {23} 57
  • {24} 60
  • {25} 63
  • {26} 65
  • {27} 67
  • {28} 70
  • {29} 76
  • {30} 79
  • {31} 80
  • {32} 84
  • {33} 87
  • {34} 91
  • {35} 93
  • {36} 103
  • {37} 106
  • {38} 109
  • {39} 110
  • {40} 111
  • {41} 115
  • {42} 116
  • {43} 116
  • {44} 118
  • {45} 119
  • {46} 121
  • {47} 123
  • {48} 124
  • {49} 125
  • {50} 127
  • {51} 128
  • {52} 129
  • {53} 134
  • {54} 136
  • {55} 138
  • {56} 140
  • {57} 141
  • {58} 144
  • {59} 145
  • {60} 146
  • {61} 149
  • {62} 151
  • {63} 153
  • {64} 154
  • {65} 157
  • {66} 158
  • {67} 161
  • {68} 163
  • {69} 165
  • {70} 168
  • {71} 169
  • {72} 172
  • {73} 172
  • {74} 176
  • {75} 178
  • {76} 180
  • {77} 182
  • {78} 185
  • {79} 187
  • {80} 190
  • {81} 194
  • {82} 196
  • {83} 199
  • {84} 204
  • {85} 206
  • {86} 213
  • {87} 216
  • {88} 218
  • {89} 221
  • {90} 224
  • {91} 228
  • {92} 230
  • {93} 231
  • {94} 235
  • {95} 237
  • {96} 239
  • {97} 243
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  • {99} 252
  • {100} 256
  • {101} 260
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  • {103} 265
  • {104} 266
  • {105} 267
  • {106} 268
  • {107} 271
  • {108} 272
  • {109} 274
  • {110} 276
  • {111} 278
  • {112} 280
  • {113} 283
  • {114} 285
  • {115} 289
  • {116} 292
  • {117} 296
  • {118} 299
  • {119} 300
  • {120} 301
  • {121} 304
  • {122} 306
  • {123} 310
  • {124} 312
  • {125} 314
  • {126} 315
  • {127} 317
  • {128} 320
  • {129} 322
  • {130} 323
  • {131} 324
  • {132} 326
  • {133} 327
  • {134} 330
  • {135} 331
  • {136} 333
  • {137} 335
  • {138} 338
  • {139} 340
  • {140} 343
  • {141} 346
  • {142} 346
  • {143} 348
  • {144} 349
  • {145} 352
  • {146} 353
  • {147} 356
  • {148} 358
  • {149} 360
  • {150} 361
  • {151} 363
  • {152} 366
  • {153} 369
  • {154} 372
  • {155} 375
  • {156} 377
  • {157} 379
  • Sources and References 383
  • Bibliography 405
  • {Index} 407
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