from the Colonies, and "a submarine boat ... the shape of a broadbacked carp." The Queen was "quite beaten," and her head was " bewildered from the myriads of beautiful and wonderful things." "Albert's name is immortalised," she wrote. All he said was that the result of his efforts was "quite satisfactory."

Three days each week they went to Hyde Park. They saw alabaster goddesses rising from alabaster shells in which water bubbled in many colours. And most of the day, they listened to an American organ, crowned by a colossal eagle, which played and played, while the leaves of the great elm tree moved gently in the cool breeze that came in from the park.

British industry was flourishing and Victorian decoration was born. The wives of the country were to put their old furniture, relics of William and Mary, Anne and the Georges, up in their garrets, and fill their rooms instead with beds of Indian fretwork and paint their walls with floral sprays and birds. Most important of all, the world was coming to London to see an exhibition of the products of peaceful occupation. Here were no clamorous politicians with their jealousies, no haggling over frontiers or brandishing of swords. The lesson was important and obvious and, as the Queen wrote, all was

"owing to Albert — All to him."


{45}

1851

PRINCE ALBERT was parsimonious, having come from a poor family, and he was also a good business man. Queen Victoria was a spendthrift, as her Hanoverian forebears had been. Greville wrote that she was "naturally inclined to be generous" while the Prince was "fond of money. "1 Perhaps the Prince's carefulness was fortunate in an England which had changed its attitude towards money since the Queen came to the throne. She had begun with a rich minority among her subjects that spent fortunes, and a vast majority that merely worked. Now money-making was a fever in the land and greed was taking the place of princely extravagance.

Prince Albert had saved two hundred thousand pounds to buy Osborne and had found time to resuscitate the finances of Coburg. With all the weight of his burdens he had also been able to husband the affairs of the Duchy of Cornwall, the estates from which the heir to the

-119-

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Reign of Queen Victoria
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Reign of Queen Victoria *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Illustrations *
  • Foreword *
  • {1} i
  • {2} 2
  • {3} 4
  • {4} 10
  • {5} 11
  • {6} 14
  • {7} 17
  • {8} 21
  • {9} 23
  • {10} 25
  • {11} 29
  • {12} 30
  • {13} 32
  • {14} 34
  • {15} 37
  • {16} 39
  • {17} 42
  • {18} 44
  • {19} 49
  • {20} 53
  • {21} 54
  • {22} 55
  • {23} 57
  • {24} 60
  • {25} 63
  • {26} 65
  • {27} 67
  • {28} 70
  • {29} 76
  • {30} 79
  • {31} 80
  • {32} 84
  • {33} 87
  • {34} 91
  • {35} 93
  • {36} 103
  • {37} 106
  • {38} 109
  • {39} 110
  • {40} 111
  • {41} 115
  • {42} 116
  • {43} 116
  • {44} 118
  • {45} 119
  • {46} 121
  • {47} 123
  • {48} 124
  • {49} 125
  • {50} 127
  • {51} 128
  • {52} 129
  • {53} 134
  • {54} 136
  • {55} 138
  • {56} 140
  • {57} 141
  • {58} 144
  • {59} 145
  • {60} 146
  • {61} 149
  • {62} 151
  • {63} 153
  • {64} 154
  • {65} 157
  • {66} 158
  • {67} 161
  • {68} 163
  • {69} 165
  • {70} 168
  • {71} 169
  • {72} 172
  • {73} 172
  • {74} 176
  • {75} 178
  • {76} 180
  • {77} 182
  • {78} 185
  • {79} 187
  • {80} 190
  • {81} 194
  • {82} 196
  • {83} 199
  • {84} 204
  • {85} 206
  • {86} 213
  • {87} 216
  • {88} 218
  • {89} 221
  • {90} 224
  • {91} 228
  • {92} 230
  • {93} 231
  • {94} 235
  • {95} 237
  • {96} 239
  • {97} 243
  • {98} 245
  • {99} 252
  • {100} 256
  • {101} 260
  • {102} 262
  • {103} 265
  • {104} 266
  • {105} 267
  • {106} 268
  • {107} 271
  • {108} 272
  • {109} 274
  • {110} 276
  • {111} 278
  • {112} 280
  • {113} 283
  • {114} 285
  • {115} 289
  • {116} 292
  • {117} 296
  • {118} 299
  • {119} 300
  • {120} 301
  • {121} 304
  • {122} 306
  • {123} 310
  • {124} 312
  • {125} 314
  • {126} 315
  • {127} 317
  • {128} 320
  • {129} 322
  • {130} 323
  • {131} 324
  • {132} 326
  • {133} 327
  • {134} 330
  • {135} 331
  • {136} 333
  • {137} 335
  • {138} 338
  • {139} 340
  • {140} 343
  • {141} 346
  • {142} 346
  • {143} 348
  • {144} 349
  • {145} 352
  • {146} 353
  • {147} 356
  • {148} 358
  • {149} 360
  • {150} 361
  • {151} 363
  • {152} 366
  • {153} 369
  • {154} 372
  • {155} 375
  • {156} 377
  • {157} 379
  • Sources and References 383
  • Bibliography 405
  • {Index} 407
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