the eighty years. The list of institutions built upon the estate in Kensington is prodigious, including the Victoria and Albert Museum and Art Library, the Science Museum, Natural History Museum, Imperial Institute, and India Museum. There are the Imperial College of Science and Technology (the Royal College of Science, the Royal School of Mines, the City and Guilds College), Royal College of Art, Royal College of Music, Royal College of Organists, and Royal School of Needle‐ work. The Meteorological Office, Entomological Society, Institute of Physics, Optical and Physical Societies, the Administrative Office of the British School in Rome, the Royal Albert Hall, and Queen Alexandra's House are also on the same site.

This list, when examined, suggests that when Prince Albert wrote,

"I have devised a plan,"
he was creating one of the greatest educational influences in the country.


{46}

1851

As PRINCE ALBERT'S power increased, there grew in him the wish to manage the affairs and lives of other people. He was, as Greville wrote, "King to all intents and purposes." The title was the Queen's, but her husband was "really discharging the functions of the Sovereign." The mixture of moralist and schoolmaster made him sit at his desk and meet every situation with just one more memorandum, sane, cold, and faintly dictatorial.

No office would have pleased him more, or given his love of managing more scope, than the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. To have played chess with the governments of Europe would have been absolute delight for his nature and his talents. What did not delight him was the way Lord Palmerston continued in that office, unpredictable and dangerous, scornful as ever of Royal opinion.

Late in October, Lord Palmerston stirred the Court and his colleagues to splendid indignation when Kossuth, the emancipator of Hungary, came to England, before leaving for America in a steam frigate placed at his disposal by the United States government. Kossuth spoke fine Elizabethan English, learned from his Shakespeare, and caused trouble wherever he went, especially when Lord Palmerston said he was willing to receive him. Britain was officially friendly with the Emperors of Russia and Austria, upon whom Kossuth poured his

-121-

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Reign of Queen Victoria
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Reign of Queen Victoria *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Illustrations *
  • Foreword *
  • {1} i
  • {2} 2
  • {3} 4
  • {4} 10
  • {5} 11
  • {6} 14
  • {7} 17
  • {8} 21
  • {9} 23
  • {10} 25
  • {11} 29
  • {12} 30
  • {13} 32
  • {14} 34
  • {15} 37
  • {16} 39
  • {17} 42
  • {18} 44
  • {19} 49
  • {20} 53
  • {21} 54
  • {22} 55
  • {23} 57
  • {24} 60
  • {25} 63
  • {26} 65
  • {27} 67
  • {28} 70
  • {29} 76
  • {30} 79
  • {31} 80
  • {32} 84
  • {33} 87
  • {34} 91
  • {35} 93
  • {36} 103
  • {37} 106
  • {38} 109
  • {39} 110
  • {40} 111
  • {41} 115
  • {42} 116
  • {43} 116
  • {44} 118
  • {45} 119
  • {46} 121
  • {47} 123
  • {48} 124
  • {49} 125
  • {50} 127
  • {51} 128
  • {52} 129
  • {53} 134
  • {54} 136
  • {55} 138
  • {56} 140
  • {57} 141
  • {58} 144
  • {59} 145
  • {60} 146
  • {61} 149
  • {62} 151
  • {63} 153
  • {64} 154
  • {65} 157
  • {66} 158
  • {67} 161
  • {68} 163
  • {69} 165
  • {70} 168
  • {71} 169
  • {72} 172
  • {73} 172
  • {74} 176
  • {75} 178
  • {76} 180
  • {77} 182
  • {78} 185
  • {79} 187
  • {80} 190
  • {81} 194
  • {82} 196
  • {83} 199
  • {84} 204
  • {85} 206
  • {86} 213
  • {87} 216
  • {88} 218
  • {89} 221
  • {90} 224
  • {91} 228
  • {92} 230
  • {93} 231
  • {94} 235
  • {95} 237
  • {96} 239
  • {97} 243
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  • {99} 252
  • {100} 256
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  • {103} 265
  • {104} 266
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  • {106} 268
  • {107} 271
  • {108} 272
  • {109} 274
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  • {111} 278
  • {112} 280
  • {113} 283
  • {114} 285
  • {115} 289
  • {116} 292
  • {117} 296
  • {118} 299
  • {119} 300
  • {120} 301
  • {121} 304
  • {122} 306
  • {123} 310
  • {124} 312
  • {125} 314
  • {126} 315
  • {127} 317
  • {128} 320
  • {129} 322
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  • {132} 326
  • {133} 327
  • {134} 330
  • {135} 331
  • {136} 333
  • {137} 335
  • {138} 338
  • {139} 340
  • {140} 343
  • {141} 346
  • {142} 346
  • {143} 348
  • {144} 349
  • {145} 352
  • {146} 353
  • {147} 356
  • {148} 358
  • {149} 360
  • {150} 361
  • {151} 363
  • {152} 366
  • {153} 369
  • {154} 372
  • {155} 375
  • {156} 377
  • {157} 379
  • Sources and References 383
  • Bibliography 405
  • {Index} 407
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