tents and used the curious phrase, "our dear camp," to describe them. She sent photographs of Aldershot to the King of Prussia and wrote to the King of the Belgians, "When I think that this camp, and all our large fleet, are without doubt the result of Albert's assiduous and increasing representations to the late and present Governments, without which I fully believe very little would have been done, one may be proud and thankful; but, as usual, he is so modest that he allows no praise. " 4

The word War was let loose again. Louis Napoleon had pledged peace towards the West; but in the East was Russia, ruled by the one monarch who had refused to acknowledge him as Emperor of the French. Here was the enemy upon whom Louis Napoleon might direct the armies which would languish without an opportunity for using their swords. Fear grew out of alarm. Prince Albert wrote to Stockmar, after a review of the British Navy at Spithead, that he had seen "the finest fleet perhaps that England ever fitted out ... forty ships of war of all kinds, all moved by steam-power but three." The Duke of Wellington, with 131 guns, went without sails, propelled only by the screw, at eleven miles an hour. The wonder called for italics. He added, "I must rejoice to see that achieved which I have struggled so long and hard to effect.... I still suffer a good deal from rheumatism in the right shoulder, which makes even writing difficult."


{52}

1853-1854

IN THE summer, the Queen and the Prince escaped to the joys of Balmoral. The new castle was "up one story," the children were well and happy, and there was confidence because of the strength of the government. The Navy and Army were also strong, and Mr. Gladstone's first budget had shown a surplus of almost two and a half million pounds. There were signs that Britain was moving towards civilization, if also towards battle. She was leading the world in a war against slavery, and there had been a movement to remove "Jewish disabilities." Lord Palmerston, at the Home Office, was creative and less rebellious. Instead of tantalizing the diplomats he was putting down "smoke nuisances," purifying the water of the Thames and improving the London drains.

-129-

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Reign of Queen Victoria
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Reign of Queen Victoria *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Illustrations *
  • Foreword *
  • {1} i
  • {2} 2
  • {3} 4
  • {4} 10
  • {5} 11
  • {6} 14
  • {7} 17
  • {8} 21
  • {9} 23
  • {10} 25
  • {11} 29
  • {12} 30
  • {13} 32
  • {14} 34
  • {15} 37
  • {16} 39
  • {17} 42
  • {18} 44
  • {19} 49
  • {20} 53
  • {21} 54
  • {22} 55
  • {23} 57
  • {24} 60
  • {25} 63
  • {26} 65
  • {27} 67
  • {28} 70
  • {29} 76
  • {30} 79
  • {31} 80
  • {32} 84
  • {33} 87
  • {34} 91
  • {35} 93
  • {36} 103
  • {37} 106
  • {38} 109
  • {39} 110
  • {40} 111
  • {41} 115
  • {42} 116
  • {43} 116
  • {44} 118
  • {45} 119
  • {46} 121
  • {47} 123
  • {48} 124
  • {49} 125
  • {50} 127
  • {51} 128
  • {52} 129
  • {53} 134
  • {54} 136
  • {55} 138
  • {56} 140
  • {57} 141
  • {58} 144
  • {59} 145
  • {60} 146
  • {61} 149
  • {62} 151
  • {63} 153
  • {64} 154
  • {65} 157
  • {66} 158
  • {67} 161
  • {68} 163
  • {69} 165
  • {70} 168
  • {71} 169
  • {72} 172
  • {73} 172
  • {74} 176
  • {75} 178
  • {76} 180
  • {77} 182
  • {78} 185
  • {79} 187
  • {80} 190
  • {81} 194
  • {82} 196
  • {83} 199
  • {84} 204
  • {85} 206
  • {86} 213
  • {87} 216
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  • {89} 221
  • {90} 224
  • {91} 228
  • {92} 230
  • {93} 231
  • {94} 235
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  • {96} 239
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  • {99} 252
  • {100} 256
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  • {103} 265
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  • {107} 271
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  • {109} 274
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  • {111} 278
  • {112} 280
  • {113} 283
  • {114} 285
  • {115} 289
  • {116} 292
  • {117} 296
  • {118} 299
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  • {121} 304
  • {122} 306
  • {123} 310
  • {124} 312
  • {125} 314
  • {126} 315
  • {127} 317
  • {128} 320
  • {129} 322
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  • {132} 326
  • {133} 327
  • {134} 330
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  • {136} 333
  • {137} 335
  • {138} 338
  • {139} 340
  • {140} 343
  • {141} 346
  • {142} 346
  • {143} 348
  • {144} 349
  • {145} 352
  • {146} 353
  • {147} 356
  • {148} 358
  • {149} 360
  • {150} 361
  • {151} 363
  • {152} 366
  • {153} 369
  • {154} 372
  • {155} 375
  • {156} 377
  • {157} 379
  • Sources and References 383
  • Bibliography 405
  • {Index} 407
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