a select committee "to enquire into the condition" of the Army before Sebastopol and "into the conduct" of those departments whose duty it was to minister to the wants of the Army. Lord Aberdeen resigned, with the offer of the Order of the Garter to console him. Lord Palmerston, with the promptness that was so embarrassing in peace and so effective in war, quickened the speed of preparation and silenced the grumbles of the people. But his methods were the same as in the past, and one of his first actions was to write a personal letter to Louis Napoleon which caused the Queen and the Prince "great uneasiness." This "sort of private correspondence" was "novel and unconstitutional, "1 but, at last, they realized that Palmerston's nature was as unchangeable as their own. Also, the news from the Crimea improved. It seemed like a sign of victory when the Emperor Nicholas died in March, escaping earthly punishment for his sins. The soldiers again raised themselves in their beds at Koulalee, to cry, "Nicholas is dead. ... Thank God. ... All blessings be with you for bringing us such blessed news. ... If he died by poison we should have peace. . . . He has been the death of thousands. " 2


{54}

1854-1855

IN SEPTEMBER, 1854, Prince Albert had crossed to Boulogne to confer with the Emperor. When he returned, he wrote a memorandum of many thousands of words, describing every incident, during the reviews and long conversations. He thought Louis Napoleon gayer than he had expected, not so pale or so old. As they drove along the "detestable" roads, they talked of the internal working of the British Government, of the Queen's objections to Lord Palmerston, of the immorality of public men in France, which the Emperor admitted, of finance, the army, Spain, Portugal, Italy, and Poland. Prince Albert thought the Emperor "quiet and indolent from constitution" and that his education was "very deficient" on subjects of the "first necessity to him." The Prince could not hide the fact, in his skillful memorandum, that he did most of the talking. The Emperor, modest about his deficiencies, said afterwards that he had "never met with a person possessing such various and profound knowledge" and that he had "never learned so much in a short time." He was "grateful" for what Prince Albert had

-136-

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Reign of Queen Victoria
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Reign of Queen Victoria *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Illustrations *
  • Foreword *
  • {1} i
  • {2} 2
  • {3} 4
  • {4} 10
  • {5} 11
  • {6} 14
  • {7} 17
  • {8} 21
  • {9} 23
  • {10} 25
  • {11} 29
  • {12} 30
  • {13} 32
  • {14} 34
  • {15} 37
  • {16} 39
  • {17} 42
  • {18} 44
  • {19} 49
  • {20} 53
  • {21} 54
  • {22} 55
  • {23} 57
  • {24} 60
  • {25} 63
  • {26} 65
  • {27} 67
  • {28} 70
  • {29} 76
  • {30} 79
  • {31} 80
  • {32} 84
  • {33} 87
  • {34} 91
  • {35} 93
  • {36} 103
  • {37} 106
  • {38} 109
  • {39} 110
  • {40} 111
  • {41} 115
  • {42} 116
  • {43} 116
  • {44} 118
  • {45} 119
  • {46} 121
  • {47} 123
  • {48} 124
  • {49} 125
  • {50} 127
  • {51} 128
  • {52} 129
  • {53} 134
  • {54} 136
  • {55} 138
  • {56} 140
  • {57} 141
  • {58} 144
  • {59} 145
  • {60} 146
  • {61} 149
  • {62} 151
  • {63} 153
  • {64} 154
  • {65} 157
  • {66} 158
  • {67} 161
  • {68} 163
  • {69} 165
  • {70} 168
  • {71} 169
  • {72} 172
  • {73} 172
  • {74} 176
  • {75} 178
  • {76} 180
  • {77} 182
  • {78} 185
  • {79} 187
  • {80} 190
  • {81} 194
  • {82} 196
  • {83} 199
  • {84} 204
  • {85} 206
  • {86} 213
  • {87} 216
  • {88} 218
  • {89} 221
  • {90} 224
  • {91} 228
  • {92} 230
  • {93} 231
  • {94} 235
  • {95} 237
  • {96} 239
  • {97} 243
  • {98} 245
  • {99} 252
  • {100} 256
  • {101} 260
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  • {103} 265
  • {104} 266
  • {105} 267
  • {106} 268
  • {107} 271
  • {108} 272
  • {109} 274
  • {110} 276
  • {111} 278
  • {112} 280
  • {113} 283
  • {114} 285
  • {115} 289
  • {116} 292
  • {117} 296
  • {118} 299
  • {119} 300
  • {120} 301
  • {121} 304
  • {122} 306
  • {123} 310
  • {124} 312
  • {125} 314
  • {126} 315
  • {127} 317
  • {128} 320
  • {129} 322
  • {130} 323
  • {131} 324
  • {132} 326
  • {133} 327
  • {134} 330
  • {135} 331
  • {136} 333
  • {137} 335
  • {138} 338
  • {139} 340
  • {140} 343
  • {141} 346
  • {142} 346
  • {143} 348
  • {144} 349
  • {145} 352
  • {146} 353
  • {147} 356
  • {148} 358
  • {149} 360
  • {150} 361
  • {151} 363
  • {152} 366
  • {153} 369
  • {154} 372
  • {155} 375
  • {156} 377
  • {157} 379
  • Sources and References 383
  • Bibliography 405
  • {Index} 407
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